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House | March 25, 2015 | Chamber | House Session

Full MP3 Audio File

[loud crowd; gavel] The house will come to order. Members will take their seats. Visitors will retire from the chamber. The Sergeant at Arms will close the doors. Members and visitors will please silence all electronic devices. Members, today's prayer will be offered by Roger Younts. Members and all visitors in the gallery are asked to please stand during the prayer, and to remain standing for the Pledge of Allegiance. Mr. Younts. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Mr. Younts] Let us pray. Lord, as we recognize that you are sovereign over our country and state, I ask You to guide our lawmakers to the right path. We recognize those placed in positions of responsibility and authority need Your inspiration and guidance to deal with the issues and problems we face. As they debate the issues of the day using their heads and hearts, help them to use their spirits to divine Your will for the state and its people, and let us recognize that despite any political differences between us we are all united through You. In Jesus' name I pray. Amen. [SPEAKER CHANGES to All Present] I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United States of America, and to the Republic for which it stands, one Nation under Gzd, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] The gentleman from Gaston, Representative Torbett, is recognized for a motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative Torbett] Mr. Speaker, the Journal from March 24th has been examined and found to be correct. I move that it be approved as written. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] Representative Torbett moves that the Journal, from March 24th, be approved as written. So many favoring approval of the journal will say aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES to All Present] Aye! [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] Opposed: No. The ayes have it. The Journal is approved as written. Members, our nurse of the day is Maimoona [??] —and if I [mis-]pronounced your name I'm sorry— from Apex, North Carolina. [Applause] Glad to have you here today, ma'am. Members, without objection, the bill filing deadline is extended to five o'clock PM today. Is there an objection? Hear none, so ordered. Members, a few courtesies of the gallery the Chair would like to make. First off— the House will come to order please. First off, a motion of Representatives Ford, Glazier, and Lucas— and Szoka, of Cumberland County. The Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to Mrs. Deborah Brown, Faculty Field Liaison of Fayetteville State University. If you could please stand so that we can welcome you. [Applause] On motion of the members from Mecklenburg, Representatives Bradford and Jeter, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to the— the Founders— {the Chair knows that I need new glasses} the Founders and Executive Committee of Big Day at the Lake. Dave and Tracy Yoakum, Robert Reed, Heidi Hansen, and Vicki Payne. Big Day at the Lake is celebrating its eleventh year by creating an opportunity for 'littles' to enjoy a day on Lake Norman. Big Day at the Lake has had over seventy events hosting these folks, has raised over $650,000. If you all would please stand, so that we can welcome you as well. [Applause] I understand we have a group in the gallery from Shelby Middle School. If you all would please stand or wave. Glad to have you. [Applause] That courtesy of the gallery would be from me. I'm your representative along with Representative Hastings, who's here. We're glad you're here today and hope you have a great visit here in Raleigh. On motion of Representatives Millis, Catlin, and Queen, and Arp, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to AIA of North Carolina, Carolina's Associated General Contractors and Professional Engineers of North Carolina, American Council of Engineering Companies of North Carolina, in honor of their legislative day at the General Assembly. If you all could please stand so that we can welcome you as well. [Applause] Thank you all. [long pause; dead air] For those engineers— we actually have an overabundance of engineers who are members of the House. We're trying to work on these guys. [laughter] On motion of Representatives Hanes, Reives, Hunter, and Willing—

[SPEAKER CHANGES] From the Forsyth, Lee, Hertford, and Edgecomb County delegations, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery and also on behalf of the chair, to the fraternity brothers of the Middle Eastern Province of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Incorporated, if you all would please stand so that we could welcome you as well. It's good to have you here. The Chair will answer a parliamentary inquiry the Chair thinks he was going to receive which is the bill filing deadline. It's the filing deadline at normally 3:00 today is the deadline to file your bills to have the next day. We're extending it to 5. No need for a panic attack Representative Cotham, it's all good. Representative, Representatives Hurley and Turner are recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Hurley and Turner, Aging Committee Report, House Bill 46, Senior Tax Reduction for Medical Expenses, favorable and re-referred to Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] That bill is re-referred to the Committee on Finance. Representatives Arp, Collins, and Warren are recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Arp, Collins, and Warren, Public Utilities Committee Report, House Bill 86 Utility Line Relocation School Board, favorable and re-referred to Transportation. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The bill is re-referred to the Committee on Transportation. Additional report? [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 265, NCEMPA Asset Sales favorable, committee substituted, unfavorable original bill and re-referred to Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The bill is re-referred to the Committee on Finance. Representative Daughtry is recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Daughtry, Judiciary One Committee Report, House Bill 78, Enact Medical Cannabis Act, unfavorable. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The bill having received an unfavorable vote from the committee is referred-is placed on the Unfavorable Calendar. The Chair is going to move the introductions of the bills and resolutions to the end of the calendar. Calendar, House Bill 201 the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Stam, Goodman, Jackson, and Fraley, House Bill 201, a bill to be entitled An Act to Amend a Process by Which the City Council Receives Citizen Input in Zoning Ordinance Amendments. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Dollar rise? Strike that, Representative Stam rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, members of the House, we had a good, spirited debate yesterday. Representative Meyer has suggested an amendment that I take- [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman will suspend. The House will come to order. If members could please take any conversations outside and give the gentleman the attention he deserves. The gentleman has the floor to continue debating the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. Representative Meyer has suggested an amendment that I think improves the bill, and I would ask that you take that up first. And then I'm looking at a second amendment that has been offered. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Wake, Representative Avila, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'll just wait until I hear from Representative Stam and I'll ask for recognition at that time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Very well. The, all right. For what purpose does the gentleman from Orange, Representative Meyer rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To send forth an amendment Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to send forth an amendment. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Meyer moves to amend the bill on page 2, lines 46 through 47 by inserting the following between those lines. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman from Orange has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Ladies and gentlemen, this amendment simply says if we're going to abolish the right to protest petition, we should give adjacent landowners enough time to prepare themselves before rezoning hearing. So this gets at the counterbalance between the ability of property developers to marshal all of their formidable forces versus adjacent landowners to have time to say we want to figure out whether we should support this or oppose this and how can we get our neighbors to pay attention to the fact that this is happening. And so what I've asked for in this one additional line to existing statute, is that in addition to the already statutory, statutory requirement for a ten day notice of public hearing, that municipalities will be required to give written notice to all adjacent property owners at least 30 days prior to the fixed date for the public hearing. So they'd have

30 days to prepare. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] If the body would give the Chair one indulgence, the Chair was just informed that we have representatives from the Big Brothers and Big Sisters of North Carolina present in the gallery. If you would please stand so that we can welcome you as well. Thank you for being here and for what you do. For what purpose does the lady from Wake, Representative Avila, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To send forward an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady would not be recognized at this time as there is an amendment before the body at this time. Further debate or discussion on the amendment sent forth by the gentleman from Orange? Does the bill's sponsor desire to debate the amendment? Seeing no lights, further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is the adoption of Amendment 2, sent forth by Representative Meyer. So many favoring adoption of the amendment will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote: 114 having voted in the affirmative and 2 in the negative, the amendment is adopted. For what purpose now does the lady from Wake, Representative Avila, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To send forward an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady is recognized to send forth an amendment. The clerk will read the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Avila moves to amend the bill on page 2, line 48, by deleting "adopted" and substituting "initiated" on that line. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady from Wake has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Along the lines of Representative Meyer's amendment, this does somewhat the same thing. By changing the wording to be "initiated," we do allow those protest petitions that are currently in the pipeline to work themselves through the system. We feel like that's only fair, since the people approached this with the law as it was existing at the time, and it only stands to reason that we should let them complete the process, but as of the May 1st deadline, that option for protest petitions is not going to be available any longer. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Stam, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The amendment doesn't harm the bill, and it's sort of like we often will put on other kinds of bills, "this bill does not affect pending litigation," and I agree with her, it should not affect zoning petitions that are in process right now. I ask you to all vote for the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is the adoption of Amendment 3, sent forth by Representative Avila. So many favoring adoption of the amendment will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote: 112 having voted in the affirmative and 1 in the negative, the amendment is adopted. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman wish to be recorded as having voted aye? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Fat fingers. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman from Richmond will be recorded as having voted aye. We're now back on the bill. For what purpose does the gentleman from Wilkes, Representative Elmore, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I need my vote changed to a yes on the Meyer amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman will be recorded as having voted yes on the Meyer amendment. Further discussion, further debate on the bill? If not, the question before the House is the passage of House Committee Substitute for House Bill 201 on its third reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote: 88 having voted in the affirmative and 29 in the negative, the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 201 passes its third reading. The bill is ordered engrossed as to the amendments and will be sent to the Senate. House Bill--actually, first I believe there's a motion from the Rules chairman, Representative Lewis, the gentleman has requested the Chair to move House Bill 146 from today's calendar to tomorrow's calendar at the request of the bill sponsor. Is that correct? Without objection, House Bill 146 will be removed to tomorrow's calendar. Is there objection? Hearing none, so ordered. House Bill 16

Clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Hamilton, House Bill 16, a bill to be entitled An Act to Repeal Outdated and Unnecessary Insurance Reporting Requirements as Recommended by the Department of Insurance. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Pendleton, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This was recommended to me by the North Carolina Department of Insurance, and it's a very technical change. It just changes a number of things in the general statutes. Just a clean-up bill. Yesterday in our insurance committee, there was no debate on it. Anybody? So I speak in favor of it. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there further discussion or debate on House Bill 16? The Chair is aware there's one. Is there further discussion or debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 16? Seeing none, those in favor of House Bill 16 will vote aye. Those opposed will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. [PAUSE] The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 16 has passed its second reading and will, without objection, be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion or debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 16? Seeing none, those in favor of passage of House Committee Substitute for House Bill 16 will say aye. Those opposed will say no. In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes have it and House Committee Substitute for House Bill 16 has passed its third reading and it will be sent to the Senate. House Bill 50. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives McNeill, Hurley, Bishop and Stam, House Bill 50, a bill to be entitled An Act to Amend the Mandatory Retirement Age for Magistrates, Judges and Justices of the General Court of Justice to Require Retirement on December 31 of the Year the Magistrate, Judges and Justices ?? the Age of 72. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Randolph, Representative McNeill, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen, this bill was heard yesterday at pensions and retirement. Received a favorable report. Basically what this bill does, in the old law when a person that was a judge or magistrate turns 72, they had to retire in the month that they would turn 72. This bill would simply move the retirement to the end of the year. This bill would have avoided the 19-person race that we had on the last ballot where you had the 19 people running for the one office. Waiting for any questions, if you have any, that's the bill. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50. Seeing none, those who favor the passage of the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50 will vote aye. Those opposing will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. [PAUSE] Representative Shepherd, does the gentleman wish to record on this matter? The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote, with 116 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50, having passed its second reading, will without objection be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion and further debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50, for what purpose does the gentleman from Rowan, Representative Warren, arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker I apologize for the inconvenience but I'd like to be recorded as

FQUHVK [0:00:00.0] Voting aye on 201. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Warne will be recorded as having voted aye on House Bill 201. Is there further discussion or debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50? If not, those favoring passage of the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50 will say aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Those oppose will say no, in the opinion of the Chairs the ayes have it, and the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 50 is adopted and will be sent to the Senate. House Bill 151, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Tine, Setzer, J. Bell, and Jackson, the House Bill 151: A bill to be entitled an act to increase the fairness and equity of the property insurance rate-making process by providing for greater transparency regarding the role of catastrophe modeling in property insurance rate filings, by providing that modeled losses in a property rate filing be properly allocable to North Carolina, and by requiring the rate bureau to designate in a filing that portion of the rate in each territory allocable to wind and hail. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Dare, Representative Tine arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker, this bill is intended to bring better information to the home owners rate making process and then make that more consumable to policy makers in the public on the backend. This bill was passed pretty much the same way last year or two years ago out of the house, unanimously it went through 18 revisions, it went in front of the Department Of Insurance, the Rate Bureau, and the insurers and there were several negotiations that took place, concluding with one more amendment yesterday brought by Representative Collins to settle a dispute between the department of insurance and the insurers, and the department of insurance came to the committee and said, “They didn’t have a problem with it.” So we pass it and so everybody should be onboard at this point as far as those folks are concerned. Basically, what this bill does is, if you bring a model, a computer model to the rate making process and say that, “We have indicated rates because of these computer models you have to bring to.” And you will notice on your desk I passed a picture of different satellite models that are just from regular weather predictions and you will see a wide variety of conclusions based on the same sets of information. So that’s why we need more than one model to compare against each other in order to set good rates as we go forward. You will also find in the bill that the next session that it takes out six pieces of information from the models, makes them separate so that those are also consumable by the commissioner and the public. We also have annual historical loss status so we can see what actually happened to maybe indicate those rates so that are being requested and there is a comparison of that model if the data does not support the models then the Commission of Insurance can then ask that additional information that reconcile those things will be brought forward. And finally, the bill would make all of the wind-inhale rates available on the Department of Insurance by territory website once the rate falling is completed. The reason for that is right now only in the 18 costal counties can you see what they are paying for wind-inhale? This will allow you to see it all over the state so those in the west that say that it’s, they are paying for somebody else’s losses and those are the ones saying they are paying for everybody else’s losses. Well, actually you know who is paying what based on what looses and have that information to make better decisions as we move forward. So at this point, I can amend the bill to you, thank you Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion further debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151? Seeing none, the question before the house is the passage of the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151, those favoring the bill will vote aye, those oppose will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine the record the vote, 114 having voted in the affirmative and one in the negative, the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151 has passed its second reading and will without objection be read at third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what… [0:05:00.3] [End of file…]

for what purpose, further discussion, further debate on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151. Seeing none, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151 on its third reading. Those who favor the motion will say aye, those opposed will say no. In the opinion of the Chair the aye's have it and the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151 has passed its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. For what purpose does the gentleman from Mecklenburg, Representative Jeter, arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To ask to change my vote. Instinctively, it being a time bill, I just assumed I was going to vote no. So I would like to be recorded as voting yes on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman will be recorded as having voted aye on the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 151. Members, without objection, at the request of the bill sponsors, House Bill 152 is going to be removed to the end of the calendar. House Bill 216, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Cotham, Horn, and Brockman, House Bill 216, a bill to be entitled an act to direct into joint legislative oversight committee to study strategies in providing North Carolina with great leaders for the great schools. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Mecklenburg, Representative Cotham, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker, to briefly speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and members. This is a rather simple. It is just a study bill asking our joint education oversight to look at our principal programs and preparing principals for leadership and I ask for your support. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Union, Representative Horn, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized the debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. We spend a lot of time, and rightly so, talking about highly effective teachers in the classroom, but a highly effective teacher in the classroom needs a highly effective principal in the school. We have an obligation to not only support them and select them but to train them and give them the skills and it's an entirely different skill set it takes to run a school than it does to be a teacher in a classroom. Not that the principal doesn't have to be a great teacher, very helpful, but as I said a different skill set and this bill, I commend Representative Cotham for bringing this bill forward to ensure we put the resources behind training and supporting our principals. The individual that hires, supervise, evaluates and sets the tone for every school in our state. Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. If not, the question before the House is the passage of House Bill 216 on its second reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote, 116 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative. House Bill 216 passes its second reading and will, without objection, be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. If not, the question before the House is the passage of House bill 216 on its third reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will say aye, those opposed will say no. The aye's have it and House Bill 216 passes its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. House Bill 242, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Faircloth and Stam, House Bill 242, a bill to be entitled an act to expand the list of crimes for which an investigative grand jury may be convened. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose, who's primary, I see three lights, who's primary on this bill? For what purpose does the gentleman from Guilford, Representative Faircloth, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and ladies and gentlemen of the House. The state of North Carolina has, for a long time, had grand jury functions in its justice system but the grand jury that we have had for many years, up until recently, was more or less just a hearing by a group of folks to see if there was enough evidence to move forward on a prosecution. The district attorney did not participate in the grand jury hearing. It was not investigative by any

In 2013, House Bill 908 was passed, and we initiated an investigative grand jury at that time, which had tools to allow for complicated situations, such as public corruption to be investigated. This particular bill expands the list of crimes for which an investigated grand jury can be convened. It’s a bipartisan effort to allow state prosecutors to convene an investigative grand jury, with permission from a three judge panel for the specified crimes. Now the crimes that are addressed in this particular bill are very, very serious crimes, I think we all would agree, having to do with violations of the drug laws, for instance, that involve large amounts of importation of drugs, or gang activity involved with drugs, or things of that nature. This bill also provides for investigation of incidents involving bribery, obstructing justice, buying and selling of all offices, and officers or employee benefiting from contracts, etc. So the nature of this is to get at those white-collar type crimes that are embarrassing and costly to our society. An investigative grand jury questions witnesses under oath, subpoenas records, and deliberates evidence of wrong doing. This compels witnesses to testify under oath, who might otherwise not cooperate with an investigation. You all seen the TV programs or movies where the federal prosecutor has somebody testifying, and trying to use all kinds of reasons for not offering information. This gives the strength to our prosecutors to require testimony from those folks who are hiding information that would help uncover serious crimes. Federal authorities have this authority. Our state prosecutors have not had the SBI, State Bureau of Investigation is in favor of this legislation. They’re the ones who are charged often with investigating particularly public corruption crimes and matters like that. They are in favor it. It’s an important tool to help uncover the truth and wrongdoing by public officials. In 2013, when 908 was passed by this House, by 116-0, the Attorney General praised that bill. SO I offer this up to you, and hope that you will favor it, and I also understand that Representative Glazier probably has an amendment. Thank you Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Glazier rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker, to offer an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Gentleman is recognized to send forth an amendment, the Clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Rep. Glazier moves to amend the bill on page one, line three, rewriting that line to read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker and thank you Representative Faircloth. This is an amendment discussed in J2 for which there’s an agreement, but we had to get the language together last night. It’s been approved by the District Attorney’s conference, and simply what it does is say if there is actually a charge as a result of an investigative grand jury, the grand jury’s findings become part of the prosecutors record, so they’re part of his or her file, appropriately. I know of no opposition of the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what reason does the gentleman from Guilford, Representative Faircloth rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] The primary sponsors support this amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Gentleman’s recognized to debate the amendment. For what purpose—further discussion or debate on the amendment? If not, the question before the House is the adoption of Amendment 1, sent forth by Representative Glazier. Favoring adoption of the amendment vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the Clerk will open the vote. The Clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative, and none in the negative, the House Committee substitute for House Bill—strike that, the amendment one offered by Representative Glazier is adopted. We’re now back on the bill. Further discussion, further debate on the bill as amended?

Purpose does the lady from Iredell, Representative Turner rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES]To ask the bill's sponsor a question, please. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Does the gentleman from, who's taking it? The gentleman from Guilford yield to the lady from Iredell? [SPEAKER CHANGES]I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES]He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Thank you, Representative, I was just checking to see about the jury service part, it says they don't have to serve for six years, rather than the two that most jurors would serve? Can you comment of that, at the very end of the bill? [SPEAKER CHANGES]Mr. Speaker, I would refer to Representative Stam, he might be able to answer that. [SPEAKER CHANGES]I yield, sorry, he yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES]A petty juror, who sits and hears a case, just one case and they're done. A grand juror may have to be there everyday or every week for a year or 18 months. So, that's the difference, they put in their time. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Okay, thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 242 on its second reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will vote, aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 242 passes its second reading. Members, because the amendment changed the title of the bill will remain on the calendar for a third reading tomorrow. House Bill 294, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Representative Boles, House Bill 294, a bill to be entitled and act to make a criminal offense to provide a cell phone to a deliquent juvenile in custody of the Department of Public Safety. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES]For what purpose does the gentleman from Moore, Representative Boles rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES]To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]We had a good meeting in committee yesterday, a good vote, and I ask for your support. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 294 on its second reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will vote, aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 294 passes its second reading, and will without objection be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES]General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 294 on its third reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will say, aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Those opposed will say, no. The ayes have it and House Committee Substitute to House Bill 294 passes its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. House Bill 295, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Representative Boles, House Bill 295, a bill to be entitled and act to permit the Division of Juvenile Justice or the Department of Public Safety to determine if it is appropriate to release certain information about escaped delinquent juveniles. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES]The gentleman from Moore, Representative Boles is recognized to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]To debate the bill, thank you. Here again, this was another bill presented by the agency. We had a good vote in the committee yesterday and I ask for your support. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 295 on its second reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will vote, aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. Representative Pendleton, does the gentleman wish to record on this vote? Representative Meyer, does the gentleman wish to record on this vote? The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 295 passes its second reading, and will without objection be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES]General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 295 on its third reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will say, aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Those opposed will say, no. The ayes have it and House Committee Substitute to House Bill 295 passes its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. I believe that brings us back to House Bill 152, is that correct, Madame Clerk?

House Bill 152, the Clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Ross, Hardister, Lewis, and Clazier. House Bill 152, a bill to be entitled, and act to enact historic preservation tax credit. General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Alamance, Representative Ross rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker, to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Members, what this bill does is just takes the old tax credit that we had and totally revamps the program. In looking at a lot of questions that came up about the old program, and looking for a way to try to help with the—our economic situation, with historic structures in North Carolina, we have been about to revise after a lot of work, a new bill the drastically reduces the credits that were in the old bill. Specifically in this bill, what it does is it reduces the credit rate on income producing properties, from 20% to 15% for expenses up to ten million dollars. It reduces the credit rate on income producing properties from 20% to 10% for expenses over ten million dollars and less than twenty. I say less than twenty is because twenty million is the cap. The old program had no caps. This program is capped here at twenty million. The next thing that we did was we recognized that there are some areas of the state where we’re trying to get economic developments stimulated, in particular Tier 1 and Tier 2 counties. So we added a bonus, a 5% credit bonus if a project takes place in a Tier 1 or Tier 2 county. That’s important. The second thing that we did was we recognized some of the older manufacturing facilities, say a mill, or in some cases like in Guilford, Alamance, or other counties, we have old abandoned furniture factories. But an old abandoned historic manufacturing facilities, there’s a 5% bonus, It also limits the credit amount to four and a half million dollars total, and we reduced the credit on non-income producing properties from 30% all the way down to 15% and non-income producing property would be a residential property. In addition to that, we have limited the credit amount on non-income producing properties to $22,500. If you do the math, that’s about a $200,000 house. And we allowed the credit to be taken in the year it was generated, instead of five installments, and all this does is extends the program on a reduced basis for five years, until January 1, 2021. Now what does this really mean? I’ve passed out and on your desk, you all have a big map. This is not the one with the hurricane on it. What this means is that this would revive economic development and pretty much every county in North Carolina, if you look historically at what’s, these projects have taken place in 90 out of 100 counties. And I say that because all too often I hear people say, “This only benefits Raleigh. This will only benefit Charlotte.” I think the map is pretty explicit. It’s all over North Carolina, and it’s in every one of our communities, mine and yours. It’s been used, as I said, 90 out of 100 counties, and since 1998—if we go back to 1998, we’ve had off 2,484 tax credit projects that have been completed state-wide, which brought in private investment of $1.67 billion. That’s “billion” with a B. That’s a lot of private investment coming in North Carolina. What this does is this boosts local economies, creates job, at the same time it preserves communities, and it preserves the very historic structures that have made North Carolina great. Now I’ve got examples I can cite, all over North Carolina. But what does it do?

it was a non-partisan study on a historic tax credit program. And what that found was that the historic tax rehabilitation credit program attracts two and one-half times more jobs at the same cost to the state treasury as an equivalent across the board tax reduction. Now, I want to repeat that. The tax credit program would bring in two and a half times more jobs at the same cost to the state treasury as the equivalent of an across the board tax reduction. Now, how does it do that? When you take these structures and you begin the process of rehabilitation, it creates jobs. It creates lots of jobs. A project going on in my district right now that just started is gonna [sic] generate about 200 jobs for the first year. What's it gonna do after that? It's gonna produce 157 residences that would not have been there. The third benefit to that, it's going to revitalize a town that was dying on the vine because the very industry that came into that town in the mid 1800's and started and this town was built around is now gonna be revived into something that's gonna reproduce results in this town--that is gonna make it thrive and come back to life. It's interesting that the structure that I'm talking about was built in 1881, and that's the same year that this town was incorporated. I'll take another example. Let's look at a program that took place over in Durham--the redevelopment of the former Golden Belt Textile Mill created 400 jobs. The building is now home to 80 commercial tenants and 37 apartments. [inaudible] to Mount Airy because this is more of a rural area. In Mount Airy, there have been 20 rehabbed historic buildings in the downtown Mount Airy area. Mount Airy has a population of about 10,000. These rehabs now host 42 businesses and 172 permanent, full-time jobs. I passed out in addition to the map, another piece--these are some numbers from Mount Airy. This piece--kind of looks like this one. I apologize for the black and white, but you know how our copy machine is here. If you look at this particular project, this is the 225-229 Market Street area of Mount Airy. Total developer capital investment into this project was $207 million. Building cost 45. If we look at the bottom of the chart you can see that the state tax credits--now this is based on the old system--was $5248 a year. It runs for five years. If you look at the state tax receipts that resulted from the rehab of these projects, you can see the second line, which by the end of the fifth year, the state tax receipts are $34,713. Now the third line is the cumulative. At the end of the fifth year the state has received back in state revenues--back to the state treasury--$142,255. That's a 26,000 dollar investment by the state to generate a $142,000 investment. That's a 462% five year return on investment. Now most of you know, I'm an investment adviser. If I could get investments that would return me 462% on a five-year investment, I'll take it all day long. Unfortunately, they're hard to find. But, they are there when you look at investments of this type in the way that we structured this program. That's directly back to the state treasury, and as you all know, we're constantly looking for ways to raise revenue. What better way to raise revenue than to revitalize communities, bring life back into communities that have lost that life as manufacturing left North Carolina, as factories closed down all across the state...whether it was textiles, whether it was furniture. They're everywhere in every one of our districts you can see these old buildings sitting there.

By doing this, we're providing jobs, we're providing homes, we're providing economic opportunity back to our local areas, and at the same time we're generating state revenue back to the treasury. That's why, to me, this type of a program is a no-brainer because the return on investment cannot even be calculated, these are just raw numbers based on the project itself. You can't put a calculation on the other things this does for a community, it's probably off the chart. That's why this program, the new program has garnered the support of the North Carolina's Metro Mayors Coalition, Preservation North Carolina, the North Carolina League of Municipalities, North Carolina Association of County Commissioners, downtown development organizations, economic developers, American Institute of Architects, Centralina Council for Governments, North Carolina Association of Realtors, local Chamber of Commerce, North Carolina Bankers Association, Real Estate and Industry Coalition, North Carolina Chapter of Planning Association, mortgage bankers, professional engineers, contractors, AGC Carolinas, your local councils of the government, the list goes on. It's a win-win for the local communities, a big win for our historic structures, and a win for the State of North Carolina. I think Bob Steinburg, my colleague here to my right said it best one day in a committee, we're one North Carolina, we're not two separate entities, the state and local government, we're actually one North Carolina, and should all be working together because when we work together, we rebuild an economy. You rebuild an economy, and I heard the Secretary of Commerce say this morning. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Mr. Speaker? [SPEAKER CHANGES]For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Floyd rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES]To see if the bill's sponsor will yield for a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Does the gentleman from Alamance yield to the gentleman from Cumberland? [SPEAKER CHANGES]I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES]He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES]You just read off the number of sponsors that you had from the industry that you just read, is that correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES]That was multiple industries, not just one industry. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Follow up, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Does the gentleman yield to an additional question? [SPEAKER CHANGES]I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES]He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Could you be so nice to read out the sponsors here in this chamber? [SPEAKER CHANGES]I would love to do that, but in essence of time let me just say there are, let me just say there are 65 co-sponsors to this bill, and it just passed through Finance yesterday with a unanimous vote, and I think that's my cue from my colleague from the other side of the aisle that it's time to put it to rest. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES]For what purpose does the gentleman from Craven, Representative Speciale rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES]To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]Once again, I'm on the other side of the issue, I don't know how it happens. This was something that we took out, year before last in the budget, so we could give a 2% tax break, and now we're trying to unravel it. This, the fair admissions, we've had several things in front of us trying to unravel what we had done two years ago. And I'm not going to speak long, I'm just going to say, God, were we wrong then, for crying out loud, that we're ready to undo it? Vote against this thing, this should be a county issue. [SPEAKER CHANGES]For what purpose does the gentleman from Burke, Representative Blackwell rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES]To speak on the bill, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES]The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES]I won't take long either, but I'll actually probably echo a little bit of what Representative Speciale just said. I voted for the tax reform we did, and I voted to eliminate a lot of other credits that were very popular, one of which was the medical deduction for seniors. And I told my people at home I voted for it and I eliminated some of their credits because we were doing it so we could reduce taxes across the board. As Representative Speciale said

We’re now unraveling that. I voted for the unemployment tax reform, which a lot of people complained was going to hurt them. But that was going to help all the employers across the state of North Carolina, and it in fact, has. In fact, I think the Governor’s probably put out press releases more than once bragging on the improvement in the employment rate and the economy in North Carolina, and how were are growing faster relative to most of the states since those reforms. There’s an entity, and I may not get the name exactly correct, that I think is the National Tax Foundation that’s been in existence for many years. It’s non-partisan, as I understand. They released a report, I think in the last year or last few months, in which they rate the tax climates attractiveness to business for all the states in the country. And they cited North Carolina as the example of the greatest improvement in rating a favorable tax climate it ever had occurred during the history of the time that they’ve been doing these ratings. And they mentioned our tax reform, and the elimination of the credits that favor certain people in certain businesses, and the unemployment tax improvement that we did. The Governor made a State of the State Address to us, and as I recall, he made the comment somewhere in there that in North Carolina and I think this would probably be true across the country, that most job growth comes from small businesses. And yet here we’re choosing to give credits to certain developers for certain properties rather than to stay the course on trying to get to that trigger that lower corporate taxes, and maybe income taxes for everyone in the state, so they all have an equal opportunity to invest with Representative Ross. I urge the House, despite the number of sponsors that are on this bill already, to reconsider this, and if you’re not going to, I hope you’ll be prepared to give serious consideration to Rep. Catlin’s bill, to restore the tax credit for seniors on their medical deductions. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Nash, Representative Collins rise. [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I’ve been looking for a way to try and agree with this bill for a long time. When it was first in the making, I heard that, number one, it was only going to be about commercial properties, wasn’t going to be about people’s residences anymore, and frankly, I’ve got two things I really can’t get past. Number one is that one. I would be a little more amenable if it was just the commercial properties. There’s no way we’re getting any of our money back on the state level for private residences, unless you assume they’re going to be homeless and not have a job if they don’t move into these particular structures which I doubt seriously. So we’re not getting any return on the state level on that money. The people who are getting the greatest return are the cities and counties in which these rehabilitations are occurring, and I have asked repeatedly if we could get some buy-in from the cities and counties. I understand the small towns like the one I live in, and counties like the one I live in are taking part. I understand. And I don’t have numbers to back this up. I haven’t had a chance to research. I’ve been busy with other things, but I have a sneaking suspicion that some of the other cities in which the city council is smart enough to know the private developers are going to be-they’re not taking a risk if they’re rehabbing a bill, and then downtown A, B, C, they’re going to start making money right away. I have a sneaking suspicion that these cities are not anteing up. The state, we can put in our money. My problem with this is the cities aren’t required to do anything in this except ask for our money. I think all parties to contract all that have skin in the game, cities and counties are benefiting by this financially far more by this more than anybody else is, than any other entity, including the state. They’re almost benefiting as private residences being rehabbed, and I can’t vote for a bill like this until me require the localities that are benefiting also have skin in the game. I hope when this bill passes out of here, that when the Senate sits on it we come back with something where we require the locals to participate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Catawba, Representative Adams rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I’m debating the bill right here now make it public. I’m standing in favor of this bill, and I--

—again, use some personal experience. First thing: this is a tax credit. This is not an appropriation, this is not a grant. This is a tax credit. This is a credit towards income earned after the fact. In other words: You do a project, the project generates income, you get a credit on a portion of the taxes you pay. So this is not money out of our pockets, so to speak. Now, in Hickory, right now today, there are four projects, two of which have been completed, that are underway using these tax credits. The first project was a mill that was falling apart when I moved there forty years ago. It's right at the front door of Lenoir-Rhyne University. 40,000 square foot hosiery mill. It was a place where homeless people lived, it was a problem, it was a hazard, and yet a group of investors—evil developers, I might add—went in and developed this, using this tax credit. What is it today? Well, it's a performing arts facility, partially. It's probably the closest thing we have to a five star restaurant in Hickory, today. It's got some local space in it, and it inspired another mill owner, about two hundred yards away, to begin work on an 80,000 square foot project, which is also gonna have restaurants, office space, housing, and a fitness center in it. Which also inspired another developer, Transportation Insight, to house their new office in another mill building about four hundred yards away. The first project was about a four million dollar investment. The second project is in excess of ten million dollars. The third project will be in excess of ten million dollars. But that's not the whole story. It's not the footprint of the projects that's going to be enhanced. It's the neighborhood around these projects. It's a whole quadrant of our downtown that's gonna be changed. As far as the residential tax credits go? The little houses, the old bungalows that date back to the 1920s that are in those neighborhoods have a chance of being renovated as well using those tax credits. I've seen it firsthand, folks. It's not just the projects. It's the whole community that benefits. It is gonna be hugely restorative, and it's gonna be a big boost to Lenoir-Rhyne University. Get this clutter out of the way. I strongly stand in favor of this Bill. And as far as the other tax credits? I'll look at 'em all individually. This is a good investment. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Bumgardner, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative Bumgardner] To debate the Bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] The gentleman has the floor to debate the Bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative Bumgardner] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. You can come in and cherrypick projects and statistics from now until tomorrow, and talk about how great some of 'em are— and I have no doubt some investments work out and some don't. I wonder how many, if we cared to, we could cite that haven't worked out, all over the state. We're still engaged in picking winners and losers here. We're going back on what we did two years ago. I want buildings to be developed that have historical significance and redeveloped downtown areas as much as anybody else does, I'm just not willing to spend other people's money to do it. Developers should have skin in the games. Everybody that's involved should have skin in the game because when businessmen make investments that don't work out they lose money. When politicians make decisions that don't work out, they get re-elected. So— [laughter] If this statistic cited here—462% return on investment—is true, then we need to develop— we need to redevelop every building in every town in this state because then we'd really have something fabulous. Because it would be Christmas for everybody. Vote against this Bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] For what purpose does the representative from Guilford, Representative Johnson, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative R. Johnson] To ask the Bill's sponsor a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] Does the gentleman from Alamance yield to the gentleman from Guilford? Does the gentleman yield to the question? [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative Ross] Yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES to Speaker] He yields? [SPEAKER CHANGES to Representative Ross] Oh, okay. Yes.

that this bill will create some jobs. [SPEAKER CHANGES] There's no question about that. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Do you also believe that if this tax credit doesn't go through, do you believe that some of these older buildings will be torn down? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I can assure you that there are some of these older buildings that will be torn down. There are a number of them, their old hold now, in fact I have a newspaper article from about a week ago from Graham, North Carolina where there's a huge mill, the Onata textile mill, which was waiting for developers to work out the numbers and be able to do a reconstruction there. Unfortunately, the rooftop caved in under the weight of the snow. So, as they get older they get more feeble and there goes a piece of history in Graham. [SPEAKER CHANGES] That's what I was getting at, is about the history also, because I think that- [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman wish to ask a second question or debate the bill? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Second question, second question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Alamance yield to the gentleman from Guilford, to a question? He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Do you think also that the history will be lost here in North Carolina, in various communities? [SPEAKER CHANGES] If you look at some of the things that have already been done, absolutely. Saxapahaw, there's a mill, would not be a vibrant operating community right now if it weren't for this historic tax credit, the previous program. [SPEAKER CHANGES] One more question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Alamance yield to a third question from the gentleman from Guilford? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Landfill, I'm going to assume that if these buildings are torn down that they're going to fill up our landfills. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'm sorry, could you repeat the question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I said if these buildings are torn down they're headed to our landfills, correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] In one way or the other, yeah. Usually they just fall in. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Okay, that's it, thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from New Hanover, Representative Catlin, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] As you all know, I am not for incentives unless they are for infrastructure, and in my opinion I think that historic preservation, rebuilding these homes and these historic buildings is infrastructure for our state. It's a place that you don't find when you go out west, it's a place that you don't find when you go to Germany because they all got bombed. It is something that makes us special in North Carolina and in the historic text, construction requirements of very strict. When I was commissioner we looked at that for one of our old buildings that we were renewing and it actually, I don't think that the contractors that build these make people aware of the cost they have to do to meet all of the historic requirements to build these buildings. So, with just the federal tax credits in hand, I don't know that the builders actually can make it break even. So this is something that does help offset some of the extra cost. They have to use historic wood, they have to use historic this and historic that to make it work. So it's not something where they just go in and get rich building it. At the end of the day North Carolina benefits from it. I did serve on the Board of Directors for the Bellamy Mansion Museum and so I was very aware of the cost of all that they do and how these credits offset some of those costs. Nobody was getting rich off it but the town of Wilmington benefited from that museum and those other things. This is one infrastructure that I do support. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Guildford, Representative Hardister, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Members, I'm a primary sponsor on this bill and I'm not a fan of tax credits. When I was approached by a constituent several months ago and asked about restoring the historic preservation tax credits, I struggled with it because I agree with some of the comments have been made, Representative Speciale made a comment earlier about a clean tax code. In general, I support that philosophy, but I think it's logical

to make an exception for this particular case, and I say that for several reasons. Number one, I think it's appropriate for the government to play a role in historic preservation. Number two, I think it really does work. The investment is there. It creates investment exclusively in North Carolina. It creates jobs. It increases property value. Another issue I was going to point out is exactly what Representative Catlin just said, infrastructure. I see this from that standpoint as well. It especially benefits small towns. I'm from Guilford County and the Guilford County Board of Commissioners, which has a republican majority, voted unanimously to reinstate the tax credits but also Gibsonville, Pleasant Garden, Oak Ridge, those three small towns in my district, they voted in favor of reinstating these tax credits, and again, those small towns have a republican majority on their council. They voted for it. The city of Greensboro has voted for it. There are projects all over the state that have benefited from having this credit in place and I think it's very safe to say that a lot of these projects would not have happened without this tax credit and there's many more projects that probably won't happen if we don't keep the tax credit in place. This bill, the tax credit, is actually scaled back. But my position is we need more time. We're an old state. This is a unique state. We have a lot of old buildings and structures that, quite frankly, have character and quality that you don't find in modern architecture. So I think this is a good bill and, Mr. Speaker, I would ask our members to support it. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Rowan, Representative Ford, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. In Kannapolis, North Carolina, my hometown, we have a unique situation right now where the city has actually bought the entire downtown, just recently, and if that were what this was about I'd be all for it. I appreciate them preserving this downtown and they definitely have skin int he game, without a doubt, and that's what we are to be looking at, but not only these other things, including private homes. My home is over 50 years old, if you all want to pay to renovate it I'll be glad to let you do it. But I think this bill is reverse Robin Hood, we're taking from the poor and the middle class and giving to the rich, and that's exactly what we're doing. We've had these projects at home that were bought up by banks, they turned around and sold them as commodities. That's not right. That's not what this was meant to do. I'm for tax reform and we've moved forward with tax reform and here we're going backwards. We got to make up our mind what we want to do. Do we want to bless everyone, help everyone, or just the chosen few? Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Pendleton, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I have a very good friend and client who does these for a living and if you want to just visit one that's such a success, two blocks down, if you go down past this side street past William Peace University you'll dead end at the Pilot Mill, it's an old textile plant, beautiful brick building built in the 1880's and Frank did this building. He said the only way it would work financially was with credits and it was on the books, Wake County property tax rolls, for $400,000 valuation and it's now in the books for $21 Million valuation. He went over to Hillsborough and did the same thing on a plant down the river. But he says he can't do any more without these credits. He did say that people are right on these homes. He doesn't believe you should do homes because you're just not going to get your money. It's not for the public good to do the old homes with the credits, you might want to use something else. So that's my two cents worth. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Members, on motion of Representatives Reives and Salmon of Lee County, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to the Young Commissioners through the Lee County 4H group. If you all would please stand so that we could welcome you here today. Glad to have you with us. [APPLAUSE] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cabarrus, Representative Pittman, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I understand the difference between tax credit and an incentive and you all know

Tax credits, I don’t mind quite as bad. The problem for me is this. If this were a bill were about actual historic preservation I could see some point in it. But, I’ll give you an example of the kind of thing that would bother me with this. The house I live in was built in 1957 as the old parsonage of one of the local Methodist churches, and I suppose if somebody wanted to, they could get that put on the historic registry. So then if I sell it to some business, and they come in wanting to renovate it, making it better for their use. They would get a tax credit for that? I don’t think so. And to take a building that is of questionable historical significance. Ripping out the first two floors and putting in a parking deck, and putting apartments when it used to be a furniture store or something like that. I don’t see how that’s historic preservation either. So I just—I have gone back and forth on this. Probably a few days ago, I would have been persuaded to vote for and I’ve just been back and forth, it’s a tough decision for me, and finally I have to say listening to the debate today and decide what to do. And from the debate I’ve heard, I’m voting no. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Catawba, Rep. Adams, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I’m just thinking about looking at these projects underway in Hickory, and I’m thinking about all the electricians, and the plumbers, and the sheetrock installers, and the people who put down flooring, and the people who have gone back and detailed out all the old features of these buildings. I’m thinking about all the jobs that is creating in our area. Those same people work on historic houses too. So I’m strongly in favor of this bill and I hope you consider more than just the tax aspects of this. This is about jobs. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman Alamance, Representative Ross rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. I’d like to clarify a couple things that have been said here, in the last little bit. First of all, I want to make sure when you’re talking about the evil developers that you understand something, and that is that the developer is the one who assumes all of the risk. There is no risk to the state, so if the developer’s going to assume the risk, doesn’t it stand to reason the developer should make a little money on it. That’s the way commerce works. The second thing I want to clear up its some things were made about making change to our tax direction. Tax policy is a complex issue, and a tax policy is not something you do one time and say, “We’re done with it, we did it, it’s over.” Every state around us has this historic tax credit program, all of them. In fact, let’s go to the state a lot of people like to use as a model. We’ll take Texas, a state that has no income tax. Well, if they have no income tax, why would they want to have a program like this? But last year, Governor Rick Perry signed into law a historic tax credit for a ta25%. Historical rehabilitation tax credit. Tax policy, like I said, is complex. Sometimes we have to look at the sources of revenue that we’re trying to generate. We have to look at what tax policy is trying to accomplish. And in this case here, what we’re trying to do is make an investment back into North Carolina through tax policy. We’re not sending money off to the Moon. And the third thing I want to mention that was just stated over here, is as far as residence, and how does a resident qualify? We’ve greatly scaled back the qualification for residents. But you can’t just take any old house and turn it into a house for tax credit. It has to be a registered, certified, historic site. What this part of the bill is designed to get at, and I’ll try to use an example. Take a city like Greenesboro. I’m a little bit familiar with Greenesboro because--

Is right next door, and every city is like this. Greensboro, Wilmington, Asheville, you name it, every city is like this. There is a group of very old colonial style homes that were built in a little corridor, a little core, a little neighborhood right next to the downtown, and Greensboro, I think they call it maybe Old Irving Park. These are the very historic houses that are the foundation of that city, and for that reason, it's important that we try to do everything we can to help preserve those old homes, because when they're gone, we won't have any old residential architecture to look at. Now, there's been a lot said about local communities and skin in the game, and as someone who's spent a lot of years in municipal government and worked a lot with county governments, I can't tell you the amount of money that local governments put in to make these things work. The project that I mentioned in Mebane, the white furniture company, the city has gone in and is moving all the water and sewer lines that go to the structure. Now, in my knowledge of water and sewer lines in my municipal days, they sell that stuff by the inch. It's not cheap. There's engineering and design work that has to go into putting all that in, and it can run into hundreds of thousands of dollars. They're redoing all the streets, streetscapes, sidewalks. They're moving one street. These are all investments the city can legally make to make this project work. Now, the city can't legally put money into the project under most of the city's charters. I know my city couldn't, but we sure could do a whole lot of infrastructure improvements to make it attractive for a developer to come in and take the risk and make it happen, and so that's how local communities participate in these things. Now granted, there are a lot of small towns all across North Carolina, tier one counties, that don't have the, the financial wherewithal to be able to do that, and I understand that, but in most of the larger cities and counties, there is a lot of skin in the game. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Guilford, Representative Hardister rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'd like to see if Representative Steven Ross will yield for a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Alamance yield to the gentleman from Guilford? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Ross, are you aware that Ronald Reagan was a supporter of historic tax credits? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'm glad you asked that. I have a, I'm not, I'm not gonna read, I'm not gonna read this, but this is actually a speech that Ronald Reagan gave to, to an organization. As most of you know, well most of you may not know. Ronald Reagan is considered the father of the historic tax credit, okay? That's important for some of you to know. He believed so much in the historic tax credit that he delivered a number of speeches about why they're important and why preserving our history and our historic structures is so important. And in the lieu of time, if any of you want to read this speech, I'll, I'll have it over here and after the, after the session you're welcome to come by or I'll give you a copy of it. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Horn, the chair, inquiry from the chair for the member. Did Winston Churchill have any quotes on the historic tax credit? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Oh, I bet he, let me read you a speech by Winston Churchill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'm sorry, the gentleman no longer has the floor. For what purpose. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Torbett rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Inquiry of the chair, mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman may state his inquiry. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I believe I heard a bell ring just a minute. Can you explain to me exactly what the meaning of that is? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, sir. What the, what the bell, well, it could mean a number of things. But what the bell meant, what the bell ringing at this time meant was that the gentleman was about, was fifteen seconds from using up his allotted time on the second speech, and so, if a member, if the member hears the bell and then doesn't, keeps talking, then usually there's a loud crack of this piece of wood up here with the gavel to notify the member that their time's expired. But that's what that was for. So, for what purpose does the gentleman from Craven, Representative Speciale rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To offer up an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to send forth an amendment. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Speciale moves to amend the bill on page four, lines 42 through 43 by inserting the following between those lines. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman from Craven has the floor to

DIMHWO [0:00:00.0] To debate an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Ladies and gentlemen, if we concede that Ronald Reagan is right, if we concede that North Carolina does need to preserve it’s heritage which we all do, I get that, we all get that then I would like you also to concede that what we did two years ago was right that we wanna stick with that. So I thought an alternative and I said, “Okay, let’s help these people out to keep these buildings going.” The legal municipalities, the sponsor of the bill said that they were for this bill, the legal county commissioners was for this bill. Well, then they should be ?? amendment because I want this thing to go through as well, I want the tax credits to go through as well, and I’m gonna let these cities and the towns if you vote for this, we are gonna let them help us by allowing them to participate with 50% of the cost depending on where the building is located, and let the counties and municipalities, okay that want this as we want it, let them help, let them put some skin in the game, they will be much more selective about which things get rehabbed and which things don’t. And I think it’s a win, win for everybody. So I ask you to support this amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Brunswick, Representative Hour arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if Representative ?? yell to a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Wake yell to the gentleman from Brunswick? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yells. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I was reading the book however, so I hope the question is… [SPEAKER CHANGES] I thought you are looking at the constitution. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Who elected the amendment that is been proposed where the county or city must paid ?? no matter one half of the tax credit? First, do you that’s constitutional and second would you characterize it as unfunded mandate to the county or city? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Regardless of the wisdom of the amendment I can’t understand why it would be unconstitutional since cities and counties are creatures of the state, and so the answer is no I don’t think it’s constitutional and it’s not an unfunded mandate because they don’t have to do it. In other words, they just wouldn’t have to approve it. I have not studied the question I was studying something else. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Brunswick, Representative Hour arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] A follow up question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Wake yell to an additional question from gentleman from Brunswick? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yells. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Just a lot of confusion on your last statement, sir it’s general here so they wouldn’t have to do it, it was… [SPEAKER CHANGES] The confession is good, I haven’t seen the amendment yet, my computer right out of battery and I haven’t seen it, I will look at it. What I was looking for was in 160A I think they are probably and here she come Miss. Churchill to advice me, I think that actually… [SPEAKER CHANGES] Permitted on the floor, expedite this process, yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Miss. Churchill under 168A, can cities directly appropriate money for this, for historic rehabilitation? I don’t but I will have the answer very shortly. You have it? Anyway. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I apologies I don’t know the answer of gentleman’s question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The Chair notices there are several ayes and I think that we can come back to the gentleman, for what purpose does the gentleman from Harnett, Representative Louis arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Inquiry with the Chair. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman may state his inquiry. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker without offering comment on the merit of debate, there seems to be some confusion between my office, the house clerk and now our stay off as if this is actually remain to this bill, I was just going to ask if the chair would perhaps propose to the offer of the amendment if he would consider withdraw ?? re-hitting to give us time to decide if it can indeed fit in this bill and if so I will let you know and we can move. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Committee just a moment. The gentleman from Craven has advised the Chair he would like to withdraw the amendment, I believe the gentleman is going to object the third reading, the Chair would… [0:05:00.3] [End of file…]

note that objection, and I believe the gentleman intends to work an amendment tomorrow. Is that correct, Representative Speciale? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That's correct. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Alright. For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Stam, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And this is only to clarify something that came up earlier. Under 160A-209(c)(15), cities can levy taxes for the purpose of historic, to undertake historic preservation programs and projects. They can use their tax money for that. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Durham, Representative Hall, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To put a question to Representative Stam. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Wake yield to the gentleman from Durham? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Stam, I heard you say this would allow the local towns and cities to fund these type projects with additional revenue. Is that correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That's the general statutes, yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? Representative Ford, does the gentleman wish to wait and run his amendment tomorrow, or does he wish to run it today? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Tomorrow. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Tomorrow? Alright. Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 152 on its second reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote: 96 having voted in the affirmative and 18 in the negative, the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 152 passes its second reading. The Chair notes objection previously by Representative Speciale, and the bill will roll over to tomorrow's calendar for a third reading. Representatives Brown, Burr, Jones, and Lambeth are recognized to send forth a series of committee reports. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Brown, Burr, Jones, and Lambeth, Health Committee Report, House Bill 281, Records to Medical Examiner, if favorable, Committee Substitute, unfavorable, original bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The original bill is placed on the unfavorable calendar, Committee Substitute calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 286, Dental Hygienists/Intraoral Local Anesthetics. If favorable, Committee Substitute, unfavorable, original bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Original bill unfavorable calendar, Committee Substitute calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 267, Amend Respiratory Care Practice Act-AB, if favorable, Committee Substitute, unfavorable, original bill and re-refer to Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The unfavorable bill is on the original calendar. The Committee Substitute is re-referred to the Committee on Finance. Notices and announcements. For what purpose does the gentleman from Durham, Representative Hall, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. The House Democratic Caucus will meet in 1425 five minutes after session adjournment today. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Carteret, Representative McElfraft, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The Appropriations Committee on Ag and NER will meet tomorrow morning, the House only, at 8:30. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Rockingham, Representative Jones, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To make an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen of the House, the House Selections Committee is scheduled to meet in Room 544 at 11:00 in the morning. I understand that we're going to have session at 11:00 in the morning, and so the House Selections will meet 15 minutes after session in 544. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Onslow, Representative Shepard, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Ladies and gentlemen of the House, I'd like to announce there will not be joint meeting of which, Transportation and Appropriations, tomorrow morning. You will be getting a notice about a meeting next week. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cabarrus, Representative Pittman, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement, sir. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, sir. The Homeland Security, Military, and Veterans Affairs Committee is scheduled for 12 tomorrow, but since we're having

The session at 11. Wish to announce the. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Just a minute, Representative Pittman. The House will come to order. There's a lot of noise, a lot of conversation. Please give the members the respect and courtesy they deserve. The gentleman from Cabbarus continues to have the floor for the announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] We will meet 15 minutes following session tomorrow, House homeland security, military, and veterans' affairs in 421, thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from New Hanover, Representative Davis rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, mister speaker. Ladies and gentlemen of the house, local government will meet tomorrow morning in room 643 at 10 o'clock AM. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Randolph, Representative McNeill rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Just wanted to remind everybody again about that application process for the community college board. Those are due by next Monday. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the, does the lady from Wilson, Representative Martin rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker. The House committee on finance will meet tomorrow morning at 8:30. We have added to the calendar House bill 265, the NCEMPA asset sale that went through public utilities today. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Union, Representative Horn rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Point of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to speak to a moment of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker. I wanted everyone to know, my seatmate Mr. Brawley is back in his district with his wife who's had a very, very serious operation a couple days ago. He sends his greetings and his appreciation for your thoughts and prayers. His wife Smoky is, it's a difficult time, but she's coming along. She's at Presbyterian hospital as I, Presbyterian hospital in Charlotte, Novant Presbyterian. I'd appreciate it if you'd keep his wife in your prayers and he hopes to be back here next week. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Surry, Representative Stevens rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] In light of the session meeting at 11 tomorrow, children, youth, and family will be canceled. We just had one bill and we've got plenty of time to take it up later. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And I believe the, it's actually a Senate bill, is that correct? We have plenty of time. For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Floyd rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Inquiry of the election and military, homeland security. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The, is that the elections committee or the military committee? Two different committees. Which? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Both, but they're meeting at the same time, 15 minutes after session. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I believe that is, that is correct, that both committees meet 15 minutes after session. [SPEAKER CHANGES] But if there's a conflict, there's a conflict with some, with some members. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The, for what purpose does the gentleman from Harnett, Representative Lewis rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if Representative Floyd would yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the, does the gentleman from Cumberland yield to the gentleman from Harnett? [SPEAKER CHANGES] By all means, sir. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative, are you aware that the 11 o'clock time slot is the time slot for these committees to meet and if a member has a conflict, it's just something that the member has to work out and prioritize where they need to be more. If there's a concern, if the member has a concern about not being able to meet those obligations, the member could bring that to the rules chair and we could take a look at that. Is the gentleman aware of that? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Follow up, mister speaker. May I respond to that? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Well, the gentleman has the floor. Actually, the gentleman from Harnett posed a question to the gentleman from Cumberland and the gentleman from Cumberland is permitted to answer that question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, yes, yes, but. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Well said. [SPEAKER CHANGES] All right then. For what purpose does the lady from Carteret, Representative McElraft rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For two announcements. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor for two announcements. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The committee on environment will meet tomorrow morning at 10 o'clock. We will have the introduction of DENR, the new secretary of DENR is some of his folks, and we will also get an update on what DENR's doing for coal ash, so we would be happy to have any other people in that committee maybe if they'd like to attend. I'd also like to remind you that our wonderful commercial fishermen are planning on feeding you tonight from 5:30 to 7:30 at Mills Construction, so don't forget to stop by and get some fresh North Carolina codfish. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what, first of all Representatives Blackwell, Bryan, and Schaffer are recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Blackwell, Bryan, and Schaffer, judiciary four committee report. House bill 127, DOT condemnation

Nation Changes, if favorable, Committee Substitute; unfavorable, original bill and re-referred to Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Original bill is placed on the unfavorable calendar, the Committee Substitute is re-referred to the Committee on Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 12, Amend Gaston Foster Care Ombudsman Program, if favorable, Committee Substitute Number 2; unfavorable, Committee Substitute Number 1. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Original bill unfavorable calendar, Committee Substitute calendar. For what purpose does the lady from Franklin, Representative Richardson, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I would like to give a congratulatory shout-out to the Rocky Mountain High School Wind Ensemble. Over the weekend, they performed in the regional contest and they received a superior rating, which is the highest rating that a school can get in this particular category. So we are proud of our high school Rocky Mountain Wind Ensemble Band. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further notices and announcements? The clerk has an announcement. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The House Committee on Appropriations, Justice, and Public Safety will meet Thursday, March 26, at 8:30 AM in Room 415. The House Committee on Health and Human Services will not meet Thursday the 26th of 2015 at 8:30 in Room 643. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Members, there are a couple other committee reports here. Representatives Davis and Stevens are recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Davis and Stevens, Judiciary 3 Committee Report, House Bill 293, Adopt Law Changes, favorable. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 297, DHHS Child Support Recommendations - AB, favorable. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 244, Community Corrections/Interstate Compact/Fund-AB, favorable and re-referred to Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The bill is re-referred to the Committee on Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 156, Legal Notices/Require Internet Publication; favorable, Committee Substitute; unfavorable, original bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The original bill, unfavorable; calendar Committee Substitute, calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 303, Dispute Resolution Amendments; favorable, committee Substitute; unfavorable, original bill be re-referred to Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Committee Substitute is referred to the Committee on Finance; the original bill unfavorable calendar. Madam Clerk, with respect to House Bill 244, it does appear this bill does not need to go to Appropriations, therefore the referral to Appropriations is stricken. Calendar. Any further notices and announcements? If not, the gentleman from Harnett, Representative Lewis, is recognized for a motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move, subject to messages from the Senate, re-referral of bills and resolutions and introduction of bills and resolutions, that the House adjourn to reconvene March 26 at 11:00 AM. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Lewis moves, seconded by Representative Hurley, that the House do now adjourn, subject to receipt of messages from the Senate. Re-referral of bills and resolutions and introduction of bills and resolutions to reconvene Thursday, March 26 at 11:00 AM. Those in favor will say aye, opposed will say no, the ayes have it. The House stands adjourned.