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House | March 18, 2015 | Chamber | House Session

Full MP3 Audio File

The House will come to order. Members will take their seats, visitors will retire from the chamber, the Sergeant-at-Arms will close the doors. Members and visitors will please silence all electronic devices. The prayer will be offered by Representative Jones. Members and visitors in the gallery will please stand and remain standing for the Pledge of Allegiance. SPEAKER CHANGES Thank you. If you will, let us pray. Our Father, our Creator, and our God, we humbly approach your throne of grace on behalf of ourselves and the people of North Carolina that we represent. As we do so, we will be mindful to enter into your gates with thanksgiving, and into your courts with praise. Your word says blessed is the nation whose god is the Lord. From the beginning of our nation, you have indeed poured out blessings upon us, by your mercy and your grace. But we confess that too often we have dishonored you and scorned your word. The nation desires your blessing, and often fails to acknowledge you as Lord and God. You are an always-faithful God who says if my people who are called by my name will humble themselves and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from Heaven, and I will forgive their sin and heal their land. We pray for every member of this body, and for all the elected leaders of our state and nation. Help us to hate what is evil and love what is good. We acknowledge that all righteous wisdom and true authority comes from you. In the words of your beloved son, we pray for thy will to be done, on earth as it is in heaven. Each one here offers their prayer in their own way, me, including myself, in the name of the Lord Jesus Christ. Amen. SPEAKER CHANGES Amen. I pledge allegiance to the flag of the United States of America. And to the Republic for which it stands, one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. SPEAKER CHANGES Representative Lewis is recognized. SPEAKER CHANGES Mr. Speaker, the journal for March 17th has been examined and found to be correct. I move that it stand approved as written. SPEAKER CHANGES Representative Lewis moves that the journal for March 17th be approved as written. Those in favor will say aye, opposed no. The ayes have it and the journal is approved as written. Representative Dollar is recognized to send forth a committee report. The clerk will read. SPEAKER CHANGES Memorandum to the Honorable Tim Moore, Speaker of the House of Representatives, from Representative Nelson Dollar, Chair, Select Committee on UNC Board of Governors Nominating. Subject: Committee Report of the Nominees of the 2015 House Election of the Vacancies of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina. Listed below are the nominees for consideration by members of the House of Representatives in the forthcoming election of the Board of Governors vacancies of the University of North Carolina under House Resolution 37. The names of the nominees are listed in alphabetical order; the members of the committee adopted the slate of nominees at a meeting on March 17, 2015: Jay Edgar Broyhill, Pearl Burris-Floyd, C. Phillip Byers, Walter Davenport, Christopher Derrick, James L. Holmes Jr., Matthew-Todd Johnson, Joe Thomas Knott III, Mary Ann Maxwell, J. Alex Mitchell, Hari H. Nath, David Powers, Richard Franklin Taylor, and Raiford Trask III. SPEAKER CHANGES Now members, for your information, members may want to pay attention to this announcement. Thank you. Members, the UNC Board of Governors election will be tomorrow, March 19th. The committee report that was just read in was the ballot of folks who will be on it. So I just want members to be aware that that vote will

Representatives Davis and Stevens are recognized to send forth the committee report to Corporal Reives. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Davis and Stevens Judiciary three committee report House Bill 82, execution, non-secured custody ordered child abuse favorable, [SPEAKER CHANGES]Hold on a minute, Calendar [SPEAKER CHANGES]House Bill 211, expand use of toxicology funds. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Calender [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Conrad and Presnell and Ross are also recognized to send forth a committee report to Corporal Reed. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Conrad, Presnell and Ross commerce and Job development committee report, House Bill 108. Site and Building development funds, favorable. Committee sub Committee substitute unfavorable of original bill and will refer to appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Original bill is placed on the unfavorable calender. Committee substitute is referred to the committee on appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Daughtry is recognized to send forth the committee report to Corporal Reives. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Daugthry Judiciary one Committee Report, house bill 130 Davy county, food for detention facilities, favorable. Committee substitute unfavorable of original bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Calender, committee substitute calendar, original bill, unfavorable calender. [SPEAKER CHANGES]House bill 146 Amendment Advanced Health Care ??? Laws. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Committee substitute calendar original bill, unfavorable calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Iler, Shepard and Torbett are recognized to send forth the committee report to Corporal Reives. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Iler, Shepard and Torbett, transportation committee report House bill 169, limit motor vehicle emissions inspection, favorable. Committee substitute unfavorable of original bill and reaffirmed to the comittee on finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Original bill is placed on unfavorable calendar,

C. Graham and L. Hall, handicapped parking veterans plate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Transportation, if favorable, Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 257, Representative Bumgardner, clean fuel act reduction. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 258, Representative Reives, school calendar flexibility, Chatham County. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Education K-12. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 259, Representatives Cleveland, R. Brown, and Riddell, general government technical corrections. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 260, Representative Hunter, school calendar flexibility, Gates County schools. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Education K-12. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 231, Representative Setzer and L. Hall, require type death certificates. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Health. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 262, Representatives Pendleton, Tine, Setzer, surplus lines amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Insurance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 263, Representative Hurley, City of Trinity terms of election. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Local Government. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 264, Representative McNeill, community college, full 3B plan[??]. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Pensions and Retirement, if favorable, Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 265, Representatives Collins, S. Martin, Stam, and Pierce, NC Eastern municipal power agencies reset act. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Public utilities, if favorable, Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 266, Representative Robinson, City of Menoa[??] satellite annexation. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Local government, if favorable, Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 267, Representatives Goodman, Glazier, and Blackwell, amend respiratory care practice act. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Health, if favorable, Finance. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 268, Representatives Iler, Torbett, Shepard, and Tine, amend transportation laws. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Transportation. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 269, Representatives Fisher, Farmer-Butterfield, Cunningham, L. Hall, caregiver relief act. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Children, Youth, and Families, if favorable, Judiciary One. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 270, Representatives Fisher, Farmer-Butterfield, L. Hall, healthy families workplace paid sick days. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Children, Youth, and Families, if favorable, Judiciary One, if favorable, Appropriations. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Bill 271, Representatives R. Moore, Alexander, Lucas, and Tine, amend dangerous dog law. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Wildlife resources, if favorable, Judiciary IV. Messages from the Senate, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senate Bill 161, first edition, a bill to be entitled an act to amend the law governing sessions, the supreme court of authorized sessions to be held in Morganton. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Judiciary One. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senate Bill 185, first edition, a bill to be entitled an act to clarify credit for the serve recommended by the North Carolina Senate in the policy advisory commission. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Judiciary Two. Members, the bill filing deadline for agency bills is 3:00 PM, the Chair will extend that deadline to 4:00 PM. So if you have an agency bill you are filing that you are filing today, please do so by 4:00 PM. House will please come to order. Members, a few courtesies of the gallery the Chair would like to extend, for a number of folks, we have, on behalf of all members of the House, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to members of the electric co-ops who are here with us today. I would ask those members who are here representing the co-ops to please stand so that we can appropriately welcome you today to the House of Representatives. [APPLAUSE] Additionally, on behalf of all of the members of the house, the Chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery to the North Carolina League of Municipalities, over 400 members of the league have gathered in Raleigh today for annual Town Hall Day, if you all would please stand so that we could welcome you as well. Thank you for being here.

AVWKPE [0:00:00.0] And I will tell members a lot of members sent forward request to recognize individually, everyone individually we might be here a while if I did that, we honor that you all are here with us today and I hope you find a productive day and visits with the members of legislation. On motion the Representative West from Cherokee County, the Chairs are happy to extend the Courtesies of the Gallery, Ben Lansford President of ?? University and his wife Beverly Lansford and Ryan ??, Executive Director of the SWA Commission, if you all please stand so that we can welcome you, thanks for being here. [Applause] I believe the number of superintendents around the state are with us today, if any folks who are here who were superintendents if you all please stand so that we can welcome you as well, thank you for being here. [Applause] The gentleman from Union, Representative Horn is recognized to speak to a moment of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker, if you ask the house to come to order please. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The house will come to order. The gentleman has the floor. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker; this opportunity to begin with Winston Churchill once said, “We make our buildings, and then our buildings make us.” North Carolina was founded in 1789 and I’m sure you all know George Remus first hand that it was 50 years after it’s founding that North Carolina enacted its first Common School Law, it’s first public school bill which actually opened it’s as Williamsburg Elementary School in Rockingham County. Well, I don’t know that it opened the doors as Williamsburg Elementary School in Rockingham County but it opened its doors in Rockingham County. Now, 175 years ago this state has now had an unbroken history of commitment to public education. We recognize public education is a very backbone not only of ours commerce, not only of our culture but ourselves, it is our history and it is our future. Since 1839, when our General Assembly enacted that Common School Law public education has been the focal point of the state. Today, as we all know nearly 60% of all of our public money collected goes to sport of education. Educational opportunities are bound in the state and we are committed to ensure that they keep on bounding so to speak. Today, with over 2,500 public schools in North Carolina we serve a diverse population of more than 1.5 million kids with over 95,000 teachers dealing with every possible challenge that one could imagine and many of us, most of us are parents we get a sampling of that everyday, well they get a sampling of that times a hundred everyday. Our public school teachers change diapers, council broken hearts, play ball and oh yeah they teach if we will just out of their way. So on this particular day, I rise to commend our public schools, our public school teachers and the commitment of North Carolina to the finest education in the world through our public schools, thank you Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Stokes, Representative Holloway raise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the resolution. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to speak to a moment of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Oh, excuse me! I’m sorry. Thank you Mr. Speaker, I raise to the first stand and say that I’m very proud to be one of the legislators who represents Rockingham County, apparently where it all got started with our public schools it is definitely… [0:05:00.4] [End of file…]

...subject that in my opinion is one of the most important we talk about here in Ralleigh and everything that we do is tied back to public education. Everything. And probably the most importantly, our jobs, economic development goes back to our schools. Goodness knows we've talked a lot about it here and if we had a nickel for every time public schools was referenced, this body would never have a need for money again. We talk about it in campaigns, we talk about it on the floor, but we talk about it because it's very important. It's in the fiber of our society and our being and we definitely need to continue to support our public schools and is something I've been proud to have been a part of and have worked on for the last 10 years. And I commend this to you. Thank you [Speaker Change] For what purpose does the gentleman from Rockingham, Representative Jones, rise? [Speaker Change] To a point of personal privilege. [Speaker Change] The gentleman is recognized to speak for moment of personal privilege. [Speaker Change] Thank you Mr. Speaker. I just want to join my colleagues in thanking our education chair Representative Horn, and our education guru, the teacher Representative Holoway. I'm just a dentist so I don't know if I'm really qualified to stay with him, but I've had the honor and privilege of being the representative in which Wentworth Elementary school is in my district, in Rockingham county. And as one who's spent a good deal of my life in schools, I appreciate the impact that my teachers had upon me and it's an honor to just be able to join with you gentlemen in recognizing the first public school in Rockingham county and our commitment to public education. [Speaker Change] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Pendleton arise? [Speaker Change] Mr. Speaker I arise for a point of personal privilege. [Speaker Change] The gentleman is recognized to speak to a point of personal privilege. [Speaker Change] I'd just wanted to remind everybody that this is the 150th anniversary of the largest battle ever fought in North Carolina in the war, the battle of Bentonville, and this sat and sun there will be a reenactment at Bentonville, down in Johnson County, with about 50,000 people. [Speaker Change] Does the gentleman from ?? , Representative Cleveland, want to speak to his observations of that battle? (laughter) The chair is happy to extend the courtesies of the gallery, to a group from Rockingham County which was the site and birthplace of the state's first public school 175 years ago. If you all could stand so we could welcome you, thank you for being here. Thank you very much. (applause) And I believe Dr. Rodney Shotwell, the superintendant of schools there, we're all glad to have you here today with us. Thank you. Calendar. House Bill 271 the clerk will read. Strike that. House Bill 73, the clerk will read. [Speaker Change] Representative Dollar. House Bill 73, a bill to be entitled an act to add certain described property to the corporate limits of the town of Cary. The journal ?? of North Carolina enacts. [Speaker Change] Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before that, the question before the house is the passage of the House Committee substitute for House Bill 73 on its third reading. Those favoring passing the bill will vote aye. Those opposed will vote no. The Clerk will open the vote. The chair will note that the gentleman from Wake, Representative Stamm, continues to be excused on this vote as he was on second reading. The Clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 113 having voted in the affirmative, and 2 in the negative. The house committee substitute for House Bill 73 passes its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. [Speaker Change] Mr. Speaker. [Speaker Change] Does the gentleman wish to be recorded as having voted aye on that bill? [Speaker Change] Yes. [Speaker Change] The gentleman will be so recorded. What, does the gentleman from Henderson wish to be recorded as having voted aye on that last vote? The gentleman will be recorded as having voted aye. House Bill 13, the clerk will read. [Speaker Change] Representative Corbett, House bill 13, a bill to be entitled an act requiring each child presented for admission into the public schools for the first time to submit proof of a health assessment... [END]

and requiring the health assessment transmittal form to be permanently maintained in the child's official school board. The General of North Carolina House enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Torbett, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker and members of the house. House Bill 13 would simply require submission of a form, and let me show you what the form is, the form is actually a one-pager but since we don't print front and back here in Raleigh, it's that right there, that's the form, require submission of a form indicating the completion of a recent health assessment prior to the first admission of a child into public schools. House Bill 13 would also require the health assessment transmittal form be permanently maintained as part of the child's official school record. The proposed committee substitute for House Bill 13 makes several conforming changes and provides that the health assessment must be made no more than 12 months prior to the date the child would have first been eligible for entry into the public schools. Ladies and gentlemen, the concern here is on the health and well-being of the children that attend our schools. You may or may not know that prior to entering into kindergarten or Pre-K, a child must have a health assessment done. Note the term must, it's the law. But let's jump one or two years ahead, let's say you have a child that's entering a North Carolina system for the first time in second grade or third grade or fourth grade, or for that account twelfth grade, no health assessment is required. This information was brought to me by a constituent, I looked in to it and just pretty much determined that at some point in time any child needs to have a health assessment done when they are entering our system, at what ever grade level. That's the nature of the bill in front of you. I understand there will be some amendments to offer. I'll be willing to listen to some of them based upon what the outcome are, I've spoken to a couple members and have agreed to hear their amendments and very possibly push them forward but you will probably hear things about, or may not, about immunizations, which has nothing to do with this health assessment. You will hear about waiting periods for the time, let's say a parent brings their child to school in the third grade and they do not have a health assessment, it's their first time entering into the system for North Carolina and they are transferring from a different state, then they have 30 days to get that information that they had a physical in another state and get it to a doctor to simply fill out this one page form and turn it in. You're going to hear that 30 days isn't long enough. Well, I'm here to tell you that 30 days may very well be long enough because it's the same 30 day period that you have to have your immunization done. It's the same 30 day period that's required to go into kindergarten for your original health assessment. So my concern is of that child as well as the other children they will be interacting with. There was a concern that it not leave a negative mark if they go past the 30 days or are sent home. First, I've been told they're not going to be sent home during that 30 day period but if it's the 31st day and they haven't gotten their paperwork in yet they will be sent home and there will be an amendment offered, I believe, that will say that that will not be a bad mark against that child simply because the lack of due diligence by the parent, and I think everyone would agree with that. With that, Mr. Speaker, I'll subject myself to any questions that may be coming and look forward to a good, swift passage of this so we can help the safety and welfare of all North Carolina children in whatever grade level. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Glazier, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, to set forth an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to send forth an amendment. The clerk will read the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Glazier moves to amend the bill on page one, line four, rewriting the lines to read: [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman from Cumberland has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker, and this is the amendment that Representative Torbett was talking about that he was kind enough to talk with us about yesterday in committee and asked us to work on the language and I believe consents on the language but let me explain the amendment. It's got a couple parts but it's allt he same issue, and that isonce a child, if the assessment is not done within the 30 days, a concern by a number of us what that that child not be suspended or have a suspension on their record or whatever we call it, that they be allowed to make up

the work when they come back and not have this used as a way to kick them out of school, and Representative Torbett I think very much was kind enough and agreed with that principle that we ought to fix that. DPI was checked with and prior to 2010, with regard to assessments as it related to kindergartners, there was a suspension. That rule was changed to a more permissive unexcused absence, but to end any concern, particularly since we're extending it K-12, this amendment simply says a child can't be suspended for that and has to be allowed to make up their work and that way it doesn't create a hardship on the child because, perhaps, the parents didn't get the assessment in time. That's really what that second paragraph and the last paragraph, the section 4.5 does that in amending the makeup work statute that we have independently. The third part on page two that you see is really just a technical fix for the word forms as it relates to the bill and, again, I know of no opposition to this and hope Representative Torbett will accept the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Torbett, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the amendment, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I did confer with Representative Glazier and am very amenable to this amendment. I would support passage of the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. For what purpose does the gentleman from Ashe, Representative Jordan, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Inquiry of the amendment sponsor. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Cumberland yield to the gentleman from Ashe? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Certainly. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Representative Glazier, what does happen after the 30 days, then, if that form is not turned in for 35, 40, 50, 60, 70 days? [SPEAKER CHANGES] As I understand, their fairly limited but the policy that's in effect at DPI, and Representative Torbett may be able to answer this better than I, that child under the statute, and the policy would certainly be out of school, wouldn't be marked as a suspension, would be marked as an absence, and under this statutory change would then be allowed, when they finally get their assessment done, be allowed to make-up the work as best that we can create that capacity. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate on the amendment? If not, the question before the House is the adoption of amendment offered by Representative Glazier to the bill. So many favoring adoption of the amendment will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote, 118 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the amendment is adopted. Members, the amendment does change the title of the bill, will have second reading today but we will not be able to take up third reading. For what purpose does the lady from Mecklenburg, Representative Cunningham, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To send forth an amendment, Mr. Chair. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady is recognized to send forth the amendment and the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Cunningham moves to amend the bill on page one, line 27 by rewriting the lines to read: [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Representative Torbett, I hope that you will think about the amendment I have put forth. I've received numerous emails from social workers and some public school nurses who are concerned about the 30 day time frame for the student to have a physical exam done. They believe that the immunization can be done within 30 days but they don't believe that parents that are moving in from out of state can establish a physician relationship in which to take the form to the physician's office and have them to sign it. So I'm asking for your support on the amendment. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman- [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'm sorry, I'm sorry, I didn't say what it did. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady continues to have the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] It would actually change it from 30 days to 60 days. They actually asked for 90 days but the 60 days is a medium, so I would ask for your support. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Torbett, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Ask the author of the amendment one question about the amendment, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady from Mecklenburg yield to the gentleman from Gaston? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes sir, I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Does the amendment also change the 30 day period to 60 days for that, but does it change it to 90 days for their principal's reporting period? [SPEAKER CHANGES] No sir, it only changes the time frame to sixty days, just to have the exam done. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I would- [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman wish to propound an additional question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady yield to an additional question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The only way I could accept the 60 day, at this current juncture, is that the reporting period for the principal is

[SPEAKER CHANGES] Currently 60, so if you timed it out at the same time, it would give no additional time so the principal would essentially have to report on the exact day the same-the 60th day. So if there's a second part in there and I have staff back there that can assist you with that to change that number to a 90, resubmit your, or submit that with that modification and I would accept that. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Torbett, I've been informed by staff that it does change it to the 60 calendar days, determination of the 60 calendar days-90 days, I'm sorry. Yes, within the 60, within the 90 calendar days after the commencement of a new school year. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman wish to ask any additional question or? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I think this might be the last question Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady from Mecklenburg yield to the gentleman from Gaston for a third question? She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Just for my clarity, you're changing the initial 30 to 60 and then the reporting period from whatever it is to 90, is that correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That's correct. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, I'd be amenable to that as well, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Representative Torbett. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] If not, the question before the House is the adoption of Amendment 2 sent forth by Representative Cunningham. So many favoring adoption of the amendment will vote aye, those opposed will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 113 having voted in the affirmative and 4 in the negative, the amendment is adopted. For what purpose does the gentleman from Durham, Representative Luebke rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Members of the House, this bill was thoroughly discussed in House Education yesterday as Representative Torbett has indicated, and as the amendments indicate. I had asked in the committee if we could be told how many schoolkids are actually affected by this law currently. The current affect on kindergarteners, and the staff reported just a few minutes, a little while ago, that the number is 4%. So 4% of the schoolkids in our system across the state are not able to meet the 30 day requirement, and do not have it at the time that they enter. How many actually are able to finish getting the health assessment in 30 days, we do not know, and I have asked staff to look at that further, but we can know for sure that 4% of the kids in our school system, trying to start out cannot start out without, with the health assessment complete. They will be able to try to get that, but we don't know how many actually won't get it and therefore will be prohibited from staying in school. I think it's important that we actually know how many it is and I will try to have that for you tomorrow. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Orange, Representative Meyer rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, I'd like to withdraw my amendment and then debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Okay, the gentleman's amendment is not before the House, the gentleman may retrieve his amendment. The gentleman is also recognized to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. I appreciate Representative Torbett's support for Representative Cunningham's amendment. This, that does make this bill more palatable to me. I do have a couple of concerns that I want to express about the bill. My primary concern is that simply extending this requirement for the physical places a hardship on specific groups of people. We know that the young people who are least likely to have access to physicals are low-income youth and are immigrant youth. Right now when you're in school, in middle school or high school, if you want to participate in an athletic activity, you have to have a physical to be on an athletic team. And in 16 years of running a mentoring program for kids in schools, I can't tell you how many times I'd have a kid who wanted to play on a soccer team or the basketball team or the volleyball team and they knew they would have to get a physical and they'd go to their parents and say "Can I get a physical?" And their mom would say, "I can't afford the physical." And so they wouldn't be able to play on the team because their family couldn't get them the physical to be able to be eligible to play. And that's just missing a team. My concern is that missing this physical doesn't take you off the team. It takes you out of school, and that just really worries me about how many of those kids are going to have to miss days of school because they don't have the physical. And even if they get the physical, all the form says is that they've got a physical. It doesn't actually tell us that they're healthy. It doesn't actually tell us anything that's useful for helping educate them in school. They could get a physical that says they're horribly sick, but as long as they got the physical, they're still pretty likely to walk into school. I also am concerned about a couple of, maybe untinten-

FLBUTF [0:00:00.0] The consequences of this bill, for those kids who are most likely to need public assistance to get the physical done they are gonna go to their county health centers, those health centers in all of our primary care providers are already overburdened and worry about this increase in the burden on them. I think in my county increasing the burden on the county health centers is gonna increase the burden on ?? taxes so we are pushing the expense for these physical as down to the county tax payers. And then finally, I just come to one thing that I have said before in this floor and I think about it occasionally here nothing has made me a bigger fan of limited government and being in the North Carolina House of Representatives. There is not a problem that brought this bill before us we didn’t have any public health outbreak, it’s a solution and search of a problem, we don’t need another Governor regulation that tells families when they should see a doctor or how to get into school, we don’t need another piece of paper when our kids… [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Guildford, Representative ?? raise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if the gentleman will yell for a question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Orange yell to the gentleman from Guildford? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yell when I’m finished, I’m almost done. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman does not yell to this time, the gentleman from Orange continues to have the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I would simply say that if you like additional Governor regulation, if you like pushing down cost of healthcare to County taxpayers, if you like making a more difficult for poor kids, immigrant kids to be out of school then this is a pretty good bill, I don’t believe this is a bill that makes our schools significantly healthier in anyway and for those reasons I think it’s just not a good use of state resources and I’m going to oppose the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Guildford raise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if the gentleman will yell. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Orange yell to the gentleman from Guildford? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yells. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you a lot of what you said in opposition to this bill would also mean in effect that you are opposed to the underlying requirement that’s already in the law for the same health assessment, are you of the opinion that the long requirement that’s been in the law for a long time should be repealed? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I think there are some very good reasons why we should try and make sure that kids are getting physicals. And if this bill was attached to say a plan for us to have nurse practitioners in schools and making sure that kids were getting physical as we could attend their learning needs that were created by physical conditions or we were talking to lessons about the type of health decisions they get may during those years using a physical to help us with those things that would help kids perform academically in school be fantastic. I think that the expectation that having a physical requirement for kindergarten gives us the benefit of making sure that family start making sure that they have regular physicals early but I don’t know that it helps us that much with school. So I will be open to the debate about, is that really a necessary requirement for enrollment in kindergarten but that’s not part of this bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, follow up. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Orange yell to the second question from the gentleman from Guildford? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yells. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I wanna zero and more, do you think that the current requirement that’s already in the law which this bill is amending, do you think that should be repealed? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I don’t believe that is at debate in this bill at this time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Scotland, Representative Pierce raise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To ask the Bill Sponsor a question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is the gentleman wished to direct the question to the gentleman from Gaston, does the gentleman from Gaston yell to the gentleman from Scotland? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I believe so Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yells. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Representative, just listen to the members speak, would that be an extra resources public health departments, school boards, anything to have with this, with school system, the point is about there are many children who for different reasons parents might not have the funds to get the assess I mean is there any consideration given to that if you don’t mind me? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, it’s my understanding that different schools happens various ?? to help that child meet the necessary requirements just like they do in the existing program in the kindergarten process. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion or further debate on the bill, for what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative… [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker to speak second time on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This is a gentleman that was talking about the needs and conditions and concerns about the child entering the school and perhaps I don’t think he has ever seen one of the actual forms possibly because here it would actually help with the understanding of… [0:05:00.4] [End of file…]

child's needs entering the system, such as what if the child had a hearing disorder that would be discovered during a physical, then that child would be able to learn more because once that disorder was determine he could be fitted with, perhaps, a hearing aid so he could learn properly in the classroom. Perhaps this physical as it's checked off here on the back page might have a vision disorder, so perhaps at that point in time that child could go get reading glasses so he could actually what's put in front of him better and maybe for the first time see the world as it truly was created. But, without the physical, perhaps that would not occur other than at kindergarten. What if it was determined a child had, God forbid, Tuberculosis, for example, and it wasn't determined. So you say you're after the health of the child, you can't be if you don't support this, as well as the other children that sit in a classroom that would be having day to day interactions with this. Sir, I deeply hope you consider voting yes on this bill. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 13 on its second reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. Representative Insko, Representative Graham, do the members wish to be recorded? The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote, 93 having voted in the affirmative and 25 in the negative, the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 13 passes its second reading and will remain on the calendar. House bill 18, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives S. Martin, Horn, Shepard, and Hanes, House Bill 18, a bill to be entitled an act provide for a planning year for the establishment of corporate innovative high schools. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Richmond, Representative Goodman, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I have clumsy fingers, I need to change my vote on the prior bill from no to yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman will be recorded as having voted aye on House Bill 13. For what purpose does the lady from Wilson, Representative Martin, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. I'm pleased to bring before you a very simple bill. This bill came out of our education innovation house study committee and it was changed in a PCS to take away the appropriation, but otherwise it was vetted in our study committee and I thank my cosponsor, Representative Horn, who carried it in Education, it had unanimous support. So the net of it is that many of us have successful cooperative and innovate high schools in our districts, more than half of the LEA's have them, and this is where we have an early college program where our high school's partner with our community college or university system. Right now we have one issue on the way that they're approved and this has come to bear, this actually is an issue that came out of my district where Wilson has been approved for a cooperative and innovative high school on contingent on the budget. So they were approved in April but they have to wait for funding to come in our final budget, which unfortunately does not always come out as quickly as we would all like it to come out in July. In this case, they are doing a lot of technological components and this will be the second early college and they don't feel comfortable starting this year and our current program is that once they're approved they have to start that calendar year. So all that this does is allow that once they are approved that they would have the option to have a planning year and then open the following year. This is not unusual for charter schools, if more is required and they're not ready to get started they can have a planning years. We took the funding out because that would be specific to an individual school and their requirements and we may look at something in appropriations but we don't want that to be required for us to be able to pass this so they know that they can continue with their planning and have a planning year and open the following year. So I would truly appreciate your support and happy to answer any questions. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? If not, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 18 on its second reading, so many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye, those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote.

The Clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 118 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, the House Committee Substitute for House Bill 18 passes its second reading and will, without objection, be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. If not, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 18 on its third reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will say aye. Those opposed will say no. The ayes have it, and the House Committee Substitute to House Bill 18 passes its third reading and will sent to the Senate. House Bill 35. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Elmore, S. Martin, Harding, House Bill 35, a bill to be entitled An Act to Establish the Legislative Task force on Education Innovation and recommended by the House Committee on Education Innovation. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wilkes, Representative Elmore, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This bill is another bill that came out of the House Innovation Committee, and what this deals with is how we tackle the idea of following innovation. The meaning of innovation is that it's constantly changing, so what this task force would be charged to do is to create a framework on how we could create a more permanent entity that would address innovative practices going on around the state. I complement the two chairmans of the House Innovation Committee, in the interim they travel the state to different locations, to look at what was going on, had different discussions. And as you can see, the way that the bill reads, that it has various stakeholders on this task force to try to create the structure. I ask for your support on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. If not, the question before the House is the passage of House Bill 35 on its second reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will vote aye. Those opposed will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. [PAUSE] The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and 1 in the negative, House Bill 35 passes its second reading and will, without objection, be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. If not, the question before the House is the passage of House Bill 35 on its third reading. So many favoring passage of the bill will say aye. Those opposed will say no. The ayes have it and House Bill 35 passes its third reading and will be sent to the Senate. House Bill 138, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Carney, L. Johnson, Elmore and Glazier, House Bill 138, a bill to be entitled an Act to Entitle the State Board of Education to Require One Arts Education Credit Prior to Graduating from High School. The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Mecklenberg, Representative Carney, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker and ladies and gentlemen of the House. I am back before you, two years ago I want to thank members in this House. We passed House Bill 127 98-19 and sent it to the Senate and it got lost over there. So I decided to file another bill, and I want to thank the primary sponsors again, Representative Johnson, Elmore and Glazier. The bill is exactly what it said as it was read in, as read in the title. It's an act to direct the State Board of Education to require one arts education credit prior to graduation from high school, and to report back to the Joint Ed Oversight 12 15 18. This bill is a bill of flexibility. It's a bill that gives the State Board the ability and the directive to design this credit and this requirement and the implementation of it. I think it has given them a lot of flexibility. What this bill is not, it is not a burden on our schools. What it does is it allows the State Board to determine what the criteria will be for the requirement. There are many options that it will consider, so that you can go back and tell people in your local districts. They may decide to look at a high school elective that's already being offered, to let that be used towards the requirement. It might be a middle school arts ed course that's already being taught. It could be an arts appreciation class that's offered online.

Or it could be an arts course for credit that's offered after school in the community. Both in and out of school experiences will be able to be used by the State Board to help to develop the criteria again for this requirement. What is happening now is that we have a lot of our students and the data shows over a hundred percent of our students are taking arts classes between six and twelfth grade. However, that number's skewed because it comes from a lot of our students are taking numerous arts courses. So what is not happening now is that all of our students are not getting that opportunity for arts ed. So this will ensure, this policy will ensure that all of our students will have that opportunity for the exposure to the arts. Thank you Mr. Speaker and I hope all those lights are to tell me to sit down. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wilkes, Representative Elmore, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak about the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] As a teacher myself and a teacher of art, of course I would feel that this bill is very important. But I try looking at the big picture, not just how it would affect me or my students but how it would affect their futures and what they're facing in life. As the economy is changing, we are seeing that creative industries are very important and that job skill sets are constantly changing. They're very different than they were even ten years ago, much less twenty years ago. The arts helped develop those types of job skills that the industries are looking for. Just in the creative industry alone, there are currently 1.9 million people working in creative industries right now. And the, by 2016 the government is expecting to see an additional 1.3 million jobs just in creative industries. Many, many studies you can get on the Internet, if you just look up benefits of art education, it'll show you report after report of skills that are developed in these classes that help these children. Like drama, for example, helps you understand social relationships, complex issues, emotions. Music improves math achievement, proficiency, reading, cognitive development. They've even found that it can boost SAT scores. Dance helps creative thinking, originality, elaboration, flexibility, improves expressive skills, even helps with the physical health. Visual arts improves content and organization of writing, sophisticated reading skills and interpretation of text. Those are the critical thinking skills that the business people are constantly asking for, is that thought process. So I think that this requirement is not too much to ask for our kids in the public schools to have to do so we can prepare them for the 21st century skills that they need. I ask for your support on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Burke, Representative Blackwell, arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. I have ?? respect for the sponsors of this legislation and I realize that it's probably on a fast track to the House, but I want to take just a couple moments to say to the House that I believe this is a mistake. It's very tempting when we come to Raleigh as legislators to think that we have an opportunity to impose our will on the folks back home. But we have 115 elected school boards who already have the authority to require an art credit in order graduate from those schools. This is basically saying, “We're going to force you to do it, whether you want to do it or not.” And if it involves the redirection or the spending of additional resources in order for you all to come up with the art teachers that are needed and the spaces that are needed for art classes, we're going to force you to do that. We're going to give you another mandate. On another occasion we'll talk to you about how we like to give you flexibility. And on another occasion we'll talk to you about how we don't want to dictate things from Raleigh. But on this occasion we're going to direct the State Board of Education to come up with more rules and ??

to require you to what you can do but what some of you have not chosen to do. I don’t think that’s the way we ought to go in this particular instance where they are fully capable of doing it. This is not about my school district, my school district is one of the school districts in the state that has chosen to require an arts elective. But I don’t think this is the time to put another mandate on the local school systems. And it has nothing to do with how I, or how I think how the House ought to feel about the quality of arts education or the appropriateness of an arts education, or the value of it. It’s that we have school boards elected and that’s their responsibility. We don’t need to make this judgement for them. So I would urge you, as members of the House, to vote against this bill - not because you are against arts education, and maybe not because you don’t even think it’s a good idea for kids to take art, or maybe for your local district to require it - but lets leave it up to them. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentlemen from Cabarrus, Representative Pittman rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES - PITTMAN] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES - PITTMAN] Thank you sir. This difference between opportunity and requirement. If something is available, the opportunity is already there. It doesn’t take making it a requirement to making it available. If there are art electives, then the opportunity is already available. And forcing someone to have to take an opportunity they don’t care to take - I don’t consider it to be appropriate. I remember in grammar school we had art teachers and music teachers coming around to our classes periodically and some of it was ok and some of it bored me to tears and I couldn’t till they went on and we got back to our regular business in class. I think for people that have a desire and interest four art courses it is great to have those available - and we should make them available - we are already doing that. A requirement is something different. I appreciate the Senate voting with me last time this came up, and I hope they will do so again and I urge you to no. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentlemen from Gaston, Representative Hastings arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES - HASTINGS] To see if the primary bill sponsor would yield for a question, and a quick follow-up? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady from Mecklenburg yield to the gentleman from Gaston? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES - HASTINGS] Respectfully, would arts include music? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Would the lady yield to an additional question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield all questions. [SPEAKER CHANGES] So, if for eight years my wife and I decided to have our daughter in violin lessons, once a week, each month, for eight years, is there a guarantee that you can give me that she would get - and these are private lessons that we pay for - is there a guarantee that you can give me today that she would get credit for that eight years, or nine, or ten of violin lessons? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Speaker, may I? [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. That’s a good question, and that’s what this bill is all about, and as I said earlier in presenting the board that this gives the flexibility to the state board that they can use both those in and out-of-school experiences to take into consideration when they are designing the credit for the requirement. Yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentlemen from Wilkes, Representative Elmore rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES - WILKES] To speak a second time on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES - WILKES] Thank you. I wish I was a professional athlete, that right now I could be in the NBA, because I’d be making good money. But as you can see from my build, and my skill set, I’m not necessarily in the NBA. When you were in high school, I want you do think about what you had to take. You had to take physical education and there’s not one of us in here that are a professional athlete. Yes, it is an opportunity. There are all sorts of opportunities But this body has dictated that certain subjects are important. Like English, science. My kids are in the fourth grade, I have twin sons, they come home and “Daddy, I just can’t stand science…

Well, sorry it helps you with your development. Okay? That's what this bill does, so we're trying to encourage this to happen to help our future workforce, because it's ever changing, and as my cosponsor on the bill says, it just gives the flexibility to the state board to set the parameters to help deal with a lot of the issues that have been brought up. Thank you mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Hastings arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And I'll try to be brief, mister speaker, but after we had a vote on this issue, I think it was in my second session, some people from around the area where I live, they called and complained and said that I was against the arts. And so what I explained to them was that no one could guarantee me that my daughter's violin lessons would count as credit, and so that's why I voted against the bill and I still don't have that confirmation of a guarantee, so it's not that I'm against the arts. It's just that I would wanna make sure that people who spend thousands of dollars privately for music lessons would get credit, and so I'm not against the arts, but that's the reason I can't vote for the bill today, is because I don't have that firm commitment that my daughter would get credit. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cabarrus, Representative Pittman arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill a second time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] With all due respect to my good friend Representative Elmore whom I deeply respect and admire, to me, comparing Phys Ed to art is comparing apples and oranges. Athlete to an artist. To me, there's no correlation there. I consider health and Phys Ed to be something essential. It's teaching you how to take care of yourself, and I think it's a much more important course that we're required to take. Art, to me, should just be an elective. It is not essential. It may be a wonderful thing. I think it is. More power to the people who have talent and interest in that, but it's not an essential, and so I simply don't see the need to add a requirement of something that is not an essential course. Let those who have the interest and the propensity take those courses, but don't force others who are not interested to take them. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Glazier arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill, mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you very much, mister speaker. I agree with the comments of my colleagues, Representative Elmore and Representative Carney and the eloquence of them. I want to speak to the art issue, but then I want to speak to a little bit more to the, the logistics issue. But I think something Representative Carney said maybe as her first statement got lost in the shuffle, but this is the culmination of a long process that involved educators, school boards, department of public instruction, business community, and numerous stakeholders from all across North Carolina that came up with these recommendations. And so it's not simply predilections or views of particular, particular members. We all know that the arts possess a unique ability to transcend all other forms of communication, to transform fear to understanding, and prejudice to tolerance, and anger to joy. And the arts provide us with a unique ability to redefine our communities and leave for future generations a really indelible footprint on our collective human experience. Arts elevate and they motivate and they teach and it really causes us to reflect and deepen our understanding of humanity, and create the better part of our existence. And so with Representative Pittman's point, and I certainly understand the PE and he's right, about the necessity as a matter of health. I would argue, and Mike Huckabee who was Governor of Arkansas at the time and became chairman of the national governor's conference argued in his year as chairman, that he chose arts and education as his primary topic. And he argued back then that that was and that the arts are as important as PE or any other subject to our collective experience and to our children's future. Representative Elmore talked about the fact that the arts are now $166 billion economic endeavor in the United States, and in North Carolina last year, 159,000 jobs

And in the age of creativity it seems to me our communities are competing internationally for the best and brightest to make their communities home, and every bit of research establishes the communities that offer arts, and arts opportunities to their children are winners in that environment. I guess my last point would be to say that the arts speaks to our history and our culture and our values as a people which is what we want to teach our children. And sometimes as children, even as parents, we don't know what we don't know, and I will forever be grateful to my school system that even though I had no inclination to do printing and to do shop when I was a kid, I had to take a shop course which taught me some skills that I never would have otherwise would have had. And I also had to take an art course when I was a kid, and I was and remain the worst artist who can only draw stick figures. But I did come to appreciate what art represented, and I did come to understand how important it was to a living, breathing democracy, and for that I really commend the bill and I think this is a great opportunity, and I think it can be done by school systems well and without any additional cost. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Mecklenburg, Representative Alexander arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I have sat here with some growing amazement. I figured this bill would not generate half of the discussion that we've had. And it caused me to journey back in my mind especially after the remarks of one of my colleagues when he discussed what is essential. It made we wonder whether or not we have wasted money out on Blue Ridge road when we put millions of dollars into an art museum. It's made me go back and think about my own education. I remember taking art classes in, like another one of my colleagues, I couldn't draw worth a you know what, but I enjoyed learning a little bit about sculpting. And it's, one person's essential is somebody else's waste of time. And who, who are we to determine which is which? Art is one of those things that helps us to expand our minds, to expand our grasp on what it is to be essentially human. I don't know whether it was done at the federal level or the state level or at the local level, but a number of public projects now spend 2 or 3% of their ?? project's costs on art. You just have to go all around my home city and you'll see how spending that money has brightened up some otherwise drab buildings, and incidentally as you look around this chamber, what do you see hanging on the walls? Do you see gym socks? Baseball bats? And this art has only recently arrived, but it does brighten the chamber. I am really standing to say folks that the intent of this bill is such that we ought to be supporting it. We really ought to be supporting it. We really shouldn't be spending our time nit picking this one to death, and believe it or not, art is important. If art hadn't been important, why would we have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars to redecorate the chamber that we are debating in right now? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Yancey, Representative Presnell

Arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill and to ask the primary sponsor a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] To which purpose does the lady wish to. [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill first. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] We have a lot of people in my district that are artists, and I'm a picture framer, so I frame a lot of the pictures, from oil to watercolor, whatever they do, but there's other aspects too. You've got clay artists that do pottery. You've got basketry. You have glass blowing. This is a job spill. This is something that we really need to look at a whole lot. It affects a lot of lives, many, many lives. Although you think you might don't want to take an art class, once you get involved in it, you might really find that it's of interest to you. I would like to ask Representative Carney just one question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady from Mecklenburg yield to the lady from Yancey? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, mister speaker. I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Do you happen to know how many school districts do not have art classes in their education curriculum? [SPEAKER CHANGES] No, I do not how many, I do not know how many. I do know that through the statistics that were provided for us that not all of the schools are offering, and there's, there's very limited of those that aren't. I think that in some form, they may offer an outside artist in the community to come in, but I'm not sure if they're offering. They're just very few. The problem is not every student is, is getting that exposure. Thank you for the question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Brunswick, Representative Iler arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To ask the primary sponsor a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the lady from Mecklenburg yield to the gentleman from Brunswick? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Certainly, mister speaker. I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] She yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker. Thank you Representative Carney. Just as a clarifying question, and those who might not have been on the education committee when these were passed out. Isn't it true that this requirement begins in the sixth grade and goes to the twelfth grade and has seven years in middle school and high school to complete this? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That's correct. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Stokes, Representative Holloway arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker. I want to thank Representative Elmore and Representative Carney for bringing his bill to us and I do apologize to them. Somehow it slipped past me, or I would have actually cosponsored it. But this is something that I think is important, and I think the kids need some exposure to art, and I don't see the harm in having it be a requirement. We're taking about one course, and the child is either going to go through this course, and it may be something that could spark a career or maybe it might be something as simple as teaching them a hobby or something that's relaxing, something that they can maybe release the anxieties of their day to day life. This bill has always created a stir. It's been around a long time, and Representative Carney, I think I remember you even trying this ten years ago when I first got here. One would think that they were perhaps teaching detrimental stuff in, in these classes that we don't want our kids to learn, but that's not the case and I don't see the harm in doing this at all. And I think about in my life, and then I'll sit down and hush, but about things that I was made to do that I perhaps didn't want to do, and one that comes to mind I can think about as a kid, on Sunday morning I didn't want to really get up and go to church. I was like every kid that wanted to sleep in and stay in bed, but with my parents it was not a choice. I had to go. And I'm thankful for that exposure because that was a life changing thing for me later on, but same thing with art. Unless they have that exposure to it, they might not have that life experience. You may not spark someone to become an artist or to do something with that in their life. I think this is a good bill. It's not gonna harm anything at all, and I think we need to just move it on and send it to the Senate and hope for the best that it may finally pass over there. Again thank you to the bill sponsors for filing this. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Robeson, Representative Graham arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Debate the bill, mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker, and I'll be brief. I know we've had a lot of discussion on this, on this bill. I'm standing to support this bill, and I want to explain to you why I'm supporting this. In high school, a student will have an opportunity as they go through their four years of training, and in some situations, early college five, five years of educational training. When a student has a chance to

They can choose their coursework. That is called self determination. A child is deciding what's of interest to them. And when a student sees that he has an opportunity to choose things that motivate him or her, to stimulate their learning, to create an interest in their educational opportunities, and they have an opportunity to choose something that's of interest to them, especially art, we should give them the opportunity. The requirement is, I understand we're talking about requirements. I don't see anything wrong with that. We have other requirements in high school. But when a child has an opportunity to take a course such as art, we as adults are giving this opportunity to that child to make that decision. And that child may decide that this is something that they are interested in. It excites them. It creates an experience in them that they thoroughly enjoy. And I believe it's an opportunity to give a student a choice. A choice to graduate from high school. And they may become an artist. But did you know all students in North Carolina have to choose in their high school environment. They have to choose a cluster. It could be computers. It could be physical education. It could be math, it could be science. They have to choose a cluster before graduation. Some students may decide, art is my cluster. Art is the cluster I want to concentrate in before I graduate from high school. So what we're doing here, I think, is creating an opportunity for a child who otherwise would not get involved in art. But we're also creating an opportunity to give that child learn a chance to learn a subject area that may keep them in school. I don't have a problem with this legislation. I actually think it's good to have this as a part of the curriculum. I have known children in our public schools who had behavior problems, who did not want to be in school. But they could sit down at a desk and they could focus on art. They could produce some wonderful artwork. And it's something that created a desire for them to be in school. Art has a lot of advantage, whether it's required or it's an elective. I don't see any problem with this being a requirement. Students have many selections in four years, and I think it's an opportunity for us to encourage that learning. I would encourage you to vote for this bill. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? Seeing none, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee substitute for House Bill 138 on its second reading. Those in favor will vote aye. All opposed will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. With 96 voting in the affirmative and 21 in the negative, the House Committee substitute for House Bill 138 has passed its second reading and will without objection be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The General Assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate? Seeing none, the question before the House is the passage of the House Committee substitute for House Bill 138 on its third reading. Those in favor of the bill will say aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Aye. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Those opposed will say no. [SPEAKER CHANGES] No. [SPEAKER CHANGES] In the opinion of the Chair, the ayes have it, and the bill passes.

The bill will be engrossed and sent to the senate. House bill 173. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representatives Fan, Faircloth, Frazier, are R. Turner. House bill 173. A bill to be entitled and act to amend various criminal laws for the purpose of improving trial court efficiency. The general assembly of North Carolina enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Stan rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To explain the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. Before I begin I'm going to object to the third reading in view of the hour. Members have asked questions about it. Haven't heard opposition but there are questions they want to have resolved. To no one will we delay right or justice. That's a problem we have. Our criminal justice system disposes of crimes in sometimes short periods but sometimes one year, three years, four years. There's not much deterrence if a criminal is not sentenced for a long period of time. and there's no justice for a innocent defendant who has to wait that long to clear his or her name.

But instead of signing a--having them sign a waiver, and dispose of a guilty plea, the magistrate is forced to send the case to a district court judge, to have the waiver signed or continue the case to a later date. Unnecessary delay. Section 4. I'm going to ask Representative Jackson to explain that after I explain some others. There will be--I do have a technical amendment to change the wording, I believe, of the title of that section. Section 5 conforms our state law to a decision of the U.S. Supreme Court in Hall vs. Florida. The reason we put this in statute, whether you agree with it or not--and I don't particularly agree with it--there's no point in having cases go forward under a mistaken apprehension of the law that then has to be appealed and retried and done all over again. So this is just doing what we have to do. It's like eating spinach, which--I do actually like spinach now, after decades of not. Section 6--as I've gotten more comment about Section 6 because it gives a judge a discretion in whether to put people who are guilty of sexual battery on the registry, the 10- to 30-year registry for sex offenders. Some people have called, wanting it to be, become more liberal--I'll use that term. They want it to be retroactive to their case. Others can't believe we're doing it anyway, because we're being soft on crime. But you have to understand, these are not the felonies of rape or second-degree rape, or first-degree sexual offense, and I'm not minimizing it, but this is the misdemeanor of sexual battery, which is a "touching," or contact, of a sexual nature, but it's not always the predator that you really want on the register that you want to stigmatize properly, usually, for 30 years. And again, we asked the people involved in this, in the Coalition Against Domestic Violence and the Coalition Against Sexual Assault, were in favor of this. I didn't think they would be, but they would be, and we had no objection in our stakeholder meeting. This will help get people to plead guilty to this when they are guilty of it, because the main reason they don't plead guilty is they don't want to be on that list for 30 years. Section 7 and 8 are really just efficiency things of sending orders by electrons through the cyberspace and through fax rather than delivering hard copies just to move the process along. Section 9 takes from "shall" to "may" a requirement about doubling the bond in certain cases. And we just passed that a couple years ago, and there have been some--really, the magistrates have told us this has resulted in some terribly high bails for things that just should not have terribly high bails just because of the sequence in which the charges came through. Matter of fact, we have a letter from one magistrate who says that people have realized this so they'll now bring charges one day after the other, so they can get their opponent, get their bonds doubled, and require them to have secure bond for things that they would have very small bonds otherwise. Again, this was a consensus idea that would really help our judicial system. I'm going to ask Representative Glazier to explain Section 10. Section 11 adopts the federal rules on evidence for business records, and this applies to civil as well as criminal cases, and just allows more evidence to come in upon a piece of paper rather than a live witness. And it was submitted to the bar association, their civil lawyers, and they were fine with it. I'm going to ask Representative Glazier to explain Section 12, and Representative Faircloth to explain Section 13 and 14, and ask Representative Rena Turner, who sort of checked it all out from the clerk side to just sort of bless it all and say it was good. And I see she says it's good, is that right? So thank you, we'll be glad to answer questions, but I would ask the Speaker if he would represent--recognize Representatives Jackson, Glazier, and Faircloth.

For a couple of other sections. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Wake, Representative Jackson, arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Ladies and gentlemen, the part of the bill that I've been asked to explain has to do with remands. These are DWI cases. We found several years ago was that smart defense attorneys who had a client who had multiple offenses pending would give notice of appeal in one case, which was treated as a first offender. And then while that case was on appeal would come in and do the second case, and that was treated as a first offense. And then they would withdraw the appeal. So the General Assembly said, we need to stop that. And we did that. This body acted in the in the mid 2000s before I got here. We said when you have an appeal that's withdrawn, the judge has to look at it and do a new sentencing. If the judge sees a new factor then he can treat it the way it should be treated. And that's a good thing in those cases. But there are a lot of cases where there's nothing that has changed. The person has appeal their DWI, they only had one, to get an interlock put it, or to come up with money, or to do their substance abuse treatment, or whatever reason. But yet we require these second hearings for all those cases. It takes about a half a day, I'm told, in Wake County. Every Monday morning we have Superior Court. Everybody lines up, decides they want a remand. They brought their money to court and are ready to take care of it. Then they have to fill out this form, assign them another court room. A clerk has to take the file to the other court room. And then another District Court judge and another prosecutor have to sit there and basically say, yes, nothing has changed. This small change in the bill will allow that to no longer be necessary. A Superior Court judge and the prosecutor who are consenting to the remand will have to certify that there have been no new sentencing factors. That basically means no new charges nor convictions to DWIs since. And so I would ask for your support. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cumberland, Representative Glazier, arise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. To debate the bill and explain two sections. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you very much, Mr. Speaker. Just an overall comment first and then the explanation of the two sections. I said this in Judiciary. I think Representative Stam should be commended on the process he used. He had multiple stakeholder meetings, transparent out in the open from all sides, for several months to put this together. It's a process that worked well and I think got rid of controversial provisions and put others in that nobody had thought about until the meetings. I think it's a great process and appreciate what he did to get here today. On Part 10 of the bill, which is disposition of certain types of biological evidence. Very briefly if you look at the provisions on Page 7 that are existing law, what you will find is we had put in place a fairly substantial way of dealing with collections of forensic evidence and how we can store we can store that, and how long we have to store that given limited space. And for different types of convictions, there are set times in which it can be destroyed once those things happen. The issue comes up, given a lot of space issues and cost issues in storing this. What's added on Page 8 is what do you do when you have items that are bulky, that are of a character that render keeping them impracticable or extremely costly for a long period of time? And can you get in a position where you can simply take samples and keep those and return items like cars, large pieces of furniture, or large property? The answer is that we set out a process that simply allows a Court to hear a petition by the District Attorney or others that the bulky item is really difficult to keep or should otherwise be returned to the owner. It gives notice to the defendant from a due process point of view. The Court will then decide after a hearing and can return the property. I think all sides agree that that's a good process. And finally, Section 12 of the bill clarifies enhanced penalties for violations of domestic protective orders. If you look on Page 9 what you'll see is the ?? language previously set out, there are certain enhancements that don't apply under the prior law to people who were charged with certain things. But we want it to apply to people who are charged if they're not convicted. This simply makes it clear that these enhancements don't apply on the conviction side because they're already enhanced under the conviction. But just because someone is charged doesn't mean on other crimes those other enhancements are going to occur. This allows this to take place under those circumstances. And I know of no objection to either provision, Mr. Speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what

Speaker Changes:for what purpose does the gentle men from ?? Representative ?? Speaker Changes:to debate the bill Mr.Speaker Speaker Changes:thank you Mr.Speaker thank you members of the house these two articles are helpful to law enforcement doing their duties and Representative ?? part 12 allow extension order and again ?? after court hearing you recall in 2011 0r 2012 ?? we passed bill which allowed a court to find street gain or member of the street or a place being used by street gin to commit cries so far could be declared by the nuisance of the court and the process was for the the community to bring a suit usually through the city authorities or place authorities the court ?? was nuisance and can then order that the nuisance an be abides ?? that worked well and helped the agencies and the cities and counties to address these gains and problems we found one problem that is that the order would expand one in some cases these order would extend up to one year and when they did the city or county or they continued to debate the nuisance that found out to start all over again with new suite that didn't seem to make sense we need to expertise matter what seems to be order this situation ?? after the entry unless extended by the court for good causes established by the Plymouth after a hearing so doesn't take anybody right ?? abide by the nuisance of the community but does expertise on that matter i ask you to look favorably on that the second one i want to speak to is part 14 certificate of relief certificate of relief many people have herd what that is but it simply court actions that allows some people who because of some criminal action been involved in long the way that there perhaps applying for job they requires some kind of certification this allows through the action of the court for a person to seek certificate of relief the change is really not a greater change it simply simplifies the wordings of the individual who has convicted ?? before it has been listed out class g class h class i ?? so this just implies the fraction and allows their partition based upon their most serious offense and have the court decide whether or nor they should out void certificate of relief ?? it's till up to the agency lifting the certification issue or whatever privilege my be it's decide to certificate ?? but at least gives that person chance ?? so risk you to look favor of the owners them two pieces Mr.chair if i have to make to debate the bill Speaker Changes: The gentlemen has the floor to continue debating the bill Speaker Changes: thank you Mr.speaker ?? Representative glaciers comment bout Representative stamps work on this,this is the really the way as similar i have side that we have the particularly technical hard to deal with legal issues that we re to work together

It took a long time. It took several months for Representative Stam to bring this all to fruition, but in the long run, it's gonna save an awful lot of money and trouble for our legal system and there are other things that we work on in this assembly that I would hope we would use somewhat the same technique. Sit around the table, talk it out, and make it work, and I urge you to support the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Iredell, Representative Turner rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady has the floor to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, mister speaker. I would also just briefly add that how proud and pleased I was to be a part of this bill, and how judiciously it was created by getting all the stakeholders together. I don't think we'll have any push back from this, because the people who would have been involved in clamoring about this were there at the table. So this is the way we should do business, and I appreciate Representative Stam for bringing this together and allowing me to be part of it as the others have said. I'm happy to give my blessing and ask that you vote green. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does Representative Stam rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To offer an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to send forth an amendment. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Stam moves to amend the bill on page seven, line 12 through 13. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman from Wake has the floor to debate the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister speaker and the House, of all the amendments I've ever offered, this is the least significant, but please vote for it anyway. It just conforms the title to an internal title to the text. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate on the amendment itself. If not, the question before the House is the adoption of amendment one offered by Representative Stam, the second reading of House committee substitute of House bill 173. So many favoring the adoption of the amendment will vote aye. Those opposed will vote no. The clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and record the vote. 115 having voted in the affirmative and none in the negative, amendment one is adopted. We are now back on the bill. For what purpose does the gentleman from Gaston, Representative Hastings rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if Representative Stam would yield for a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Does the gentleman from Wake yield to the gentleman from Gaston? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] He yields. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Stam, very respectfully, I didn't have the luxury of being on any of the committees, so I'm trying to work my way through this bill here quickly, and going over the misdemeanor punishment chart. In the sexual battery issue in section six, just to clarify, the sexual battery is an A1 misdemeanor, correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Correct. That's the most serious misdemeanor. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Follow up? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And then I'm looking over the prior conviction levels, the one, two, and three conviction levels, and I'm just wondering if it was the intent when we're trying to determine if the person has mitigating or aggravating circumstances, I'm assuming that depending on the level, one, two, or three, that would be relevant when that decision is made regarding whether that person is a danger. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Certainly. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Follow up. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Follow up. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Gentleman is recognized for a follow up. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And, and respectfully, I apologize, I'm trying to work my way through this, but in the A1 misdemeanors, that's considered serious enough for some people to receive active time. Is that correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That is correct, and actually, many people don't know it's more likely to get active time on an A1 misdemeanor than a class I felony. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Lee, mister Reives rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I would just note for the record I hit the button early so I'm going to be now repeating what Representative Faircloth and Glazier just said. I just wanted to commend Representative Stam. As a person who's done criminal prosecution and criminal defense, I thought he did an amazing job getting together the stakeholders on this matter, talking it through, and making sure they came up with a good., clean bill that worked for everybody. Came up with a lot of compromises

And I just wanted to thank him personally as somebody who's going to be practicing doing a lot of this stuff for all the efforts that you put through. I notice something that he started last year and for him to identify the problem, and to work on it like he did, I think is commendable, and I like Representative Faircloth and hope to see a lot more of that during this session. Thank you. SPEAKER CHANGES And for what purpose does the gentleman from Mecklenburg, Representative Bishop, rise? SPEAKER CHANGES Inquiry of Representative Stam. SPEAKER CHANGES Does the gentleman-- SPEAKER CHANGES I yield. SPEAKER CHANGES Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Representative Stam, I noticed in Section 11 A of the bill--and I'm a civil litigator so I don't know that much about the rest of parts--but there seems to be a great revision to Rule 803 of the Rules of Evidence to permit custodians of business records to authenticate those records not by live testimony but as the rule's now revised to say, it says or by a certification made by the custodian or witness. My question is, is that--is the intention there the word "certification"--is that to mean an affidavit? SPEAKER CHANGES It could be an affidavit. I don't think it has to be an affidavit, but this is--as I understand it this is the federal rule. SPEAKER CHANGES Follow up, Mr. Speaker. SPEAKER CHANGES Does the gentleman yield for a follow up? SPEAKER CHANGES I do. SPEAKER CHANGES The word--I just did a quick search through the Rules of Civil Procedure and the only place the word "certification" appears is in the rule ?? context where an attorney's signature is taken to be a certification of certain things like well-grounded in fact and so forth to rule that an ??. If this--I believe this would be a very useful change if it were made clear that the requirement is to have an affidavit. I'm unfamiliar with--I can't speak specifically as to whether this language has been put in federal Rule 803, the certification language, but it's otherwise to me unknown. I believe it would be a great revision if it were an affidavit, and that would be a better word. SPEAKER CHANGES Representative Bishop, and you do more litigation than I do--I'm going to object--as I mentioned, I'm objecting to third reading, and if we could overnight get the answer to that, that would be great. SPEAKER CHANGES I thank the gentleman. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. SPEAKER CHANGES Being no further discussion, no further debate, the question before the House is the passage of House Bill 173, on its second reading. All those in favor will vote aye, all those opposed will vote no, the clerk will open the vote. The clerk will lock the machine and close the vote. The ayes are 116, and one in the negative and the bill will be--the bill passes, it will remain on the calendar for third reading. Representative Stam? SPEAKER CHANGES I forgot to object, but you left it on the calendar. Thank you. You read my mind. SPEAKER CHANGES Notices and announcements. For what purpose does the gentleman from Rutherford, Representative Hager, rise? SPEAKER CHANGES Thank you, Mr. Speaker, for an announcement. SPEAKER CHANGES The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. SPEAKER CHANGES Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Republicans will caucus 15 minutes after session ends in Room 544. SPEAKER CHANGES For what purpose does the gentleman from Johnston, Representative Langdon, rise? SPEAKER CHANGES For a point of personal privilege. SPEAKER CHANGES The gentleman is recognized to speak to a point of personal privilege. SPEAKER CHANGES I know everybody's been sitting here long enough today, but I wanted to remind you that if you didn't remember and see all that today, that this is Ag Awareness Day. It is the number one industry in North Carolina, and we've got a goal that by 2020 we're going to be to $100 billion and we're working on that. There was one point that I wanted to remind people about. Sometimes we don't think this, that of the 52,400 farms in North Carolina, 90% of them are small farms. So agriculture in North Carolina is spread across a lot of things in a lot of different ways, and I think we tried to make people aware today particularly of that, and I appreciate your indulgence of that. Thank you. SPEAKER CHANGES For what purpose does the gentleman from Henderson, Representative McGrady, rise?

For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Colleagues, I just want to announce that as in past sessions we have now formed what will be the joint county caucus. This, I believe started out as an informal caucus. Representative Carney, Representative Justice, and others years ago brought together former county commissioners and people that were particularly interested in county sets of issues, and it evolved to a formal caucus, and I anticipate in the near future we'll announce our first caucus meeting of the session probably one afternoon after session, and thereafter as with some of the other caucuses have a probably early morning day where we'll have the opportunity to look at legislations going forward, talk about subjects of mutual concern. The chairs of the caucus are Representative Carney and myself for the House and Senators Foushee and Davis for the Senate. And all members of the House and the Senate who are former county commissioners are sort of automatically members of the caucus initially, although all members of the House and the Senate are, have the opportunity to join and participate in the caucus as you, as you so desire. So I just wanted to announce, mister Speaker, that the caucus has now been formed. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Noted. Messages from the Senate. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister Speaker, it is ordered that messages be sent to your honorable body notifying that you, that pursuant to Senate resolution 47, adopted, a Senate resolution to establish the procedure for nominating and electing members of the Board of Governors of the University of North Carolina. The Senate has elected the following individuals to the University of North Carolina Board of Governors. W. Louis Bissette, Jr., John C. Fennebresque, Thom C. Goolsby, Harem Frank Grainger, Anna Spangler Nelson, O. Temple Sloan III, William Well, Mica ?? Willingford, respectfully, Sarah Lane, principal clerk. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Noted. For what purpose does the gentleman from Robeson, Representative Graham rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement, mister speaker. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. The Democratic Rural Work Group will meet fifteen minutes after session in room 1425. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Cabarrus, Representative Pittman rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mister Speaker, if I may, I have an announcement and then a point of personal privilege if that's okay. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized both to an announcement and a point of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, sir. Announcement is that the committee on homeland security, military, and veterans affairs will meet at noon tomorrow in LOB 421. Our speaker for tomorrow is Lieutenant Colonel Bill Callen, US Marine Corps retired, who will be speaking to us on matters of homeland security, terrorism threats, that sort of thing specific to North Carolina. I expect it to be an intriguing and eye opening presentation. Seating is limited in that room, but you're welcome to come and attend if you'd like to hear what he has to say. For the point of personal privilege, I hope this will not be out of order. If you so rule, I would not argue, but I would like to say thank god that Benjamin Netanyahu won his reelection yesterday. I would like to say that the Lord told Israel a long time ago, whoever blesses you, I will bless. Whoever curses you, I will curse. To my knowledge, he has not retracted that statement. Shema Israel adonai elohenu, adonai ehad. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Rowan, Representative Ford rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Committee on local government will meet in the morning at 10 AM in 643. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the lady from Guilford, Representative Harrison rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] An announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The lady is recognized for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Members of the Guilford delegation, we're gonna have a brief meeting around Cecil Brockman's desk immediately after session. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Randolph, Representative McNeill rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For a point of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized to speak to a moment of personal privilege. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'd just like to recognize the city of Asheboro, North Carolina, who today received an award from the great places legislative event for best main street in North Carolina. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from New Hanover, Representative Catlin rise?

For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] If doesn't snow tonight, environmental committee will finally meet tomorrow, and it'll be 5:44 at ten o'clock. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentleman from Rockingham, representative Jones, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] For an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman has the floor for an announcement. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Speaker, I want to announce the continuation of the legislative prayer caucus. In 2011 North Carolina was among a handful of the first states to form a legislative prayer caucus as an official caucus of our state legislative body. The state caucuses are patterned similar to the congressional prayer caucus, which was established by Congress in 2005. Since North Carolina, other states have since followed with legislative prayer caucuses as well. The North Carolina legislative prayer caucus adopts these purposes: One is to recognize the vital role that God's answer to prayer has played in the establishment and the continued success of our state and nation, and in making us a more generous, more cooperative, and more forgiving people than we otherwise might have been; number two, to collect, exchange, and disseminate information about prayer to God as a fundamental and enduring feature of life; and number three, to use legislation to assist the state and its people in continuing to draw upon and benefit from this essential source of our strength and well-being. Our members also work to preserve the presence of religion, faith, and morality in the marketplace of ideas. We're dedicated to protecting religious liberty and recognizing the rich spiritual history of our state and our nation. Mr. Speaker, I serve as the house chair of the legislative prayer caucus. Senator Norman Sanderson serves as the senate chair, and we're pleased to announce the continuation of our caucus. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For what purpose does the gentlemen from Mecklenburg, Representative Jeter, rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Notification. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman is recognized for a notification. [SPEAKER CHANGES] House Banking Committee will have its inaugural meeting of 2015 at 12 o'clock in room 12281327. We will be taking up the three bills that should have been on your calendar given to you last week. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further notices and announcements. If not, the gentleman from Harnett, Representative Lewis, is recognized for a notion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. Speaker. Mr. Speaker, I move that the house adjourn subject to re-referral of bills and resolutions, appointment of conferees, and reading of representative statements, to reconvene Thursday, March 19th at 2 o'clock p.m. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Representative Lewis moves, seconded by Representative Iler, that the house adjourn to reconvene Thursday, March 19th, at 2 o'clock p.m. Those in favor will say aye. Those opposed will say nay. The ayes have it. We stand adjourned.