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Senate | June 5, 2014 | Chamber | Proceedings

Full MP3 Audio File

Senate will come to order. Sergeant arms close the doors. Members go to their seats. Members and guests in the gallery please silence all electronic devices. Leading the Senate in prayer is Chaplain Ron Benzing. of Hendersonville. Chaplain Benzing works with Associated Gospel Churches of Greenville, South Carolina and is a guest of Senator (Tom) Apodaca. All members and guests in the gallery will please stand. Shall we pray. Almighty God, creator and sustainer of all that is seen and unseen; we thank you for the abundance of blessings that you shower upon us. You formed us from the dust of the earth and breathed in to us the breath of life. Made us in your likeness, so that we can enjoy a personal relationship with you as well as with others. We're blessed with freedom as a nation and our liberties came at a great price. And we thank you for the many who laid down their lives for that purpose. Please protect our men and women in uniform, who are at this very hour in places of hardship and danger. Lord, encourage the leaders of this senate to seek your wisdom as they conduct important business during this session. May their deliberation and decisions honor you so that the citizens of this great state may lead a quiet and peaceable life in all godliness and honesty. Lord God you're the judge of all the earth and before whom we will stand one day to give account for ourselves. May we stand in the grace and mercy of the Lord Jesus Christ in whose name we pray. Amen. Senator (Phil) Berger is recognized for a motion. Thank you Mr. President. The journal of Wednesday, June 4, 2014 has been examined and is found to be correct. I move that we dispense with the reading of the journal and that it stand approved as written. That objection, the journal for June 4 stands approved as written. We do have leaves of absence granted today for Senators (Wesley) Meredith and (Tom) Apodaca. Senators, our nurse of the day is Alice M. Hill of Goldsboro, North Carolina. Nurse Hill please stand and be recognized. Thanks for your service to the senate. Senators, upon the motion of Senator (Shirley B.) Randleman of Wilkes County the chair is happy to extend courtesies of the gallery to Rebecca Lynn Kieger, mother of Paige Victoria Kieger. Rebecca Lynn Kieger if you're in the audience or in the gallery, please stand and be recognized. Upon the motion of Senator Gladys Robinson and Thom Goolsby of Guilford and New Hanover counties the chair is happy to extend courtesies of the gallery to Raymond King and Sonya McTillman of Be Wise Kids. They're fighting against child sexual abuse in North Carolina. Please stand and be recognized. Thank you for your service to our state. Do we have any reports of standing committees? Introduction of resolution the clerk will read. State resolution 879, a joint resolution honoring the life and memory of Zebulon Doyle Alley, former member of the general assembly. Senator Berger is recognized for a motion. Thank you Mr. President. The senate bill 879 honors Zeb Alley which was just read by the reading clerk. I move that that bill be placed on the floor calendar for Tuesday, June 10, 2014. That objection so ordered. And, Mr. President, I have another motion. Floor is yours senator. Senate Bill 812: Maintain State Authority Over Academic Standards. I move that the rules be suspended and that bill be recalled from the appropriations committee and placed on the calendar today at the end of the calendar. That objection so ordered. At the end of the calendar senator? Yes sir. Senator Berger, we do not have either of the other two bills so senate bill 812 is up for consideration currently.

On the calendar. Senate bill 812 the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senate Bill 812. Maintain state authority over academic standards. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Berger. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Before we start on that bill, since it was added to the calendar, I have indicated to the minority leader that we would be willing to take a recess so that they can review where we are with that and we with the senate’s permission I'd ask that we take a recess until 11:30. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Without objection the senate will recess until 11:30. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senators may I have your attention? The senate is going to stand in recess until 11:45. We will stand in recess until 11:45 subject to the reading of committee reports. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Reports of standing committees. Senator Hunt for appropriations based budget, submits for passage. Senate bill three. In favor as the bill, as favorable as committee substitute bill, titled, inactive facilitate economic development within the state calendar. Senate bill 743 unfavorable as committee substitute bill number one but favorable as to committee substitute bill number two. North Carolina economic development partnership modification calendar. [SPEAKER CHANGES] So, come to order. Members go to their seats. Sargent of Arms close the doors. Members and guests in the galleries please silence all your electronic devises. Senator Berger is recognized for a motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. President. While we were in recess, two bills were read in, senate bill 743, North Carolina economic development partnership modifications. I'd ask that, that bill be added to the calendar today. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Without objection, so ordered. [SPEAKER CHANGES] And Mr. President, and senate bill three jmack modifications was also read in, I'd move that, that bill be added to the calendar as well. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Without objection so ordered. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senators were back into the calendar with senate bill 812. Senator Soucek. Senator Soucek in the chamber. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President if we could displace that bill and move onto the next one please? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Without objection so ordered. Senate bill 743 the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senate bill 743 NC economic development partnership modification. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brown is recognized to explain the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. President. This bill has been heard both in commerce and in appropriations. Some pretty good debates, several moments, so I hope most feel that we've made this bill even a little better through the committee work. What the bill does in part one of the bill establishes the framework for the department of commerce to contract with a nonprofit corporation. The bill incorporates a number of requirements regarding that contract. First is a limitations on scope, second is oversight, third is a contractual prerequisites, fourth is mandatory contract terms, and fifth is reporting an applicability of laws. I'm still working on that word. That I think we've reviewed pretty thorough in committee. The second part of the bill renames the North Carolina board of science and technology as the North Carolina board of science, technology, and innovation. Which would gain the duty to advise and make recommendations to the nonprofit corporation on the role of science, technology, and innovation. Part three of the bill divides the state into eight geographic regions to facilitate collaboration and coordination planning and resource use, improve cooperation, facilitate increased efficiencies, receive advice on economic development issues by local boards established by nonprofit corporation. Establish one stop assistance in each region for citizens and businesses. Part four modifies the existing educational districts to match the prosperity zones.

… position, and part five of the bill provides for review of reports and intent to address certain topics by the General Assembly, and then this morning we added part six to the bill, which would enact the film and entertainment grant fund to the Department of Commerce. The Department would adopt rules for administration of this program, and some of those rules include grant may be given in periods of up to three years, fund cannot be used for productions unless they meet minimum qualifying expenses, funds cannot go to more than one production company for single production, funds cannot go to a production that is obscene, political advertizing, fundraising, marketing, news programming, live sporting events, radio productions, talk game, boards, gala shows, or productions that do not have in the end credits a statement of filming in North Carolina, the North Carolina Film Office logo and acknowledgement of any involved local film offices. Priority for the funds are based on reasonable expectations of benefits to the state, using among other factors percentage of North Carolina resident employed, and to obtain these grants, a production company must apply to the Secretary and pay an application fee of one thousand dollars. That pretty much is what the bill does. I’ll try to answer any questions if there are, so I give the bill to you. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Any discussion or debate? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Rabin, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill, please. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Rabin has the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President, members. I wanted to commend the staff and the committee for the work they’ve done on this, and I especially want to thank everyone for their support of the section six on the film industry. That is a very important part of this bill and a very important - [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Berger, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Make a motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Berger, you have the floor for a motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President, I would ask that this bill be displaced. I’ve just been told that there’s an amendment that’ supposed to be coming that’s not prepared yet, and members, I apologize for this, but I do think that we’re ready for the first bill at this time. I think Senator Soucek and Senator Tillman are in the chamber now. [SPEAKER CHANGES] So we’re going to displace 743. We’re going to move back to Senate Bill 812. It was already been read without objection. Senator Soucek, you are recognized to explain Senate Bill 812. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. President and members of the Senate. This bill had gone through many iterations with lots and lots of input. This came out of our Legislative Study Committee. We had extensive experts, public hearings, lots and lots of input from the public and from experts from all around the state and around the county, quite frankly, and this is a bill that we think is really important as we look at the most highest priority is having high age-appropriate standards for our students. Two things that you really need to see in this bill that are critical are that it will be unambiguous that North Carolina controls North Carolina high school, or standards for academics. There will be a control; there will be a commission put in place to recommend to the state board any changes that need to be made from the standard course of study. North Carolina needs to be in control of the standards and will be. The second thing that’s very important is there will not be a gap in standards. This does not change what our students are going to be learning in class tomorrow. The students and teachers for three years have been working along these standards and will continue to do so while this commission vigorously looks to make North Carolina standards high and age-appropriate. I recommend your support. Senator Tillman does have a few amendments that I support. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Send forth three amendments. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator, you can send forward your amendments. I think we have them up here. What order would you like to move with those amendments? [SPEAKER CHANGES] You have them. Let’s start the one on ATL-52, version 3. Removes the money section. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator, we have ATL-52, version 4. [SPEAKER CHANGES] That’s not the version I have. Let’s move to the next one then. [SPEAKER CHANGES] What’s the next one? Which one is that? [SPEAKER CHANGES] That is ATL-53, version 2. [SPEAKER CHANGES] 53, 2. The Clerk will read.

Senator Tillman moves to amend the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman's recognized to explain the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This simply removes the appropriation from the bill and that's all it does. The appropriation is in the budget so we don't need it in here. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any discussion or debate? Hearing none. The question before the Senate is the passage of Amendment 1. All in favor vote aye. Opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for the voting. The clerk will record the vote. Clark, Clark, aye, Rabin, Brunswick County, Rabin, aye. 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, Amendment 1 is adopted. The bill, as amended, is back before the body. Senator Tillman is recognized for the next amendment. Senator Tillman, which amendment would you like to have second? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Let's go back, Mr. President, to the version 4 that you have on removes the money. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Excuse me. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman moves to amend the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman is recognized to explain the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This is language that is technical and it clears up any of the questions in version 3 and it's technical in nature and this is putting language in place that is reflective of our desire to direct our standards and have the highest standards in then nation, or if not among the highest, the highest in the nation. That's what that little section does. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any discussion or debate? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Stein, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To see if Senator Tillman will yield for a question [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President, Senator Tillman. The effective date, I'm looking at section 7, line 17, that becomes effective July 1, 2014. Wasn't that the effective date in the original bill? What does this do here? I haven't had the chance to compare it against the original bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The original bill effective date is July 1st, and that's not changed in any of, the amendments change none of that. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any further discussion or debate? Hearing none. The question before the Senate is the passage of Amendment 2. All in favor vote aye. Opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for the voting. The clerk will record the vote. McKissick, Brown, aye, aye. 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative amendment 2 is adopted. The bill, as amended, is back before the body. Senator Tillman is recognized for a third amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The third amendment simply makes it clear [SPEAKER CHANGES] One second, Senator. Senator, one second. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman Moves to amend the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman is recognized to explain the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President. This section simply makes it clear that we are prohibiting statewide elected officials and General Assembly members from serving on the commission. This would be in order to eliminate any hint of political, any council of state member, or any member of the General Assembly would be prohibited from serving on the commission. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any discussion or debate? Hearing none. The question before the Senate is the passage of Amendment 3. All in favor vote aye. Opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for the voting. The clerk will record the vote. Graham, Graham aye, 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, Amendment 3 is adopted. The bill, as amended, is back before the body. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman has the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Ladies and Gentlemen, members of the senate, we've been through a six-months process in the LRC committee looking at one topic and that's Common Core. We've examined all sides and in working on this bill we have brought in all of the interested parties. I've heard from the Tea Party, I've heard from the Liberal soccer mom's, I've had State Superintendent, Chairman of the State board of Education, I've had the Governor's staff involved, and I've had the North Carolina Chamber and Best NC. I've had some valuable input from these folks and much of that is included in the bill and I am proud to say that we have the support of those groups. Now we've come a long ways in working with all the groups

and I believe we have a bill that will put our standards on a higher level, particularly in the math area where their too weak on the upper end and unrealistic and not age appropriate on the beginning end. I think that's pretty universally accepted. if people didn't know what the standards say. And I feel good at the point we are and I'm certainly glad to recommend that and very glad to have the support of these other interested groups. Thank you, Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Stein, for what purposed do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To debate the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Stein, you have the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President, members of the Senate. I wanted to commend Senator Tillman and the amendments he offered today. I think they do improve the bill but when I come here before to cast a vote my criteria isn't is this a less bad bill than the one that was introduced? And yes, this bill now meets that criteria. I think we should be passing laws that actually improve the situation and I think this bill, unfortunately, does not and I'll explain briefly why. Education is the bedrock for our future economic opportunity and if we're going to succeed as a state it's going to be based on having young people and workers who have the brain power to compete. We can't, nor should we ever want, to compete with the rest of the world on wages. We're gonna lost that every time and we should. We need to have better talented people. What is apparent is that our kids are not sufficiently college or career ready. We have to continually strive to improve public education so that we can have our kids have the best chance to succeed. You look at international tests and where does the United States fit on international tests. The sad reality is we're falling compared to the rest of the world. We graduate fewer people who were ready to go to college. We talked about this before, that there's too many remedial courses in community college. Businesses are saying that when they post jobs they can't find the right qualified people to fill those jobs, which is why a whole bunch of people, republicans and democrats alike, came together at the end of 2008, in the last presidential administration, this had nothing to do with the federal government it was governors and state superintendents from around the country coming together with business leaders and education experts and they said we need to expect more. We need more out of our kids, more out of our teachers, and that's where this initiative came from. In 2010, we adopted a new North Carolina course of study that had higher standards for math and English than the old course. Everybody, everybody is the consensus view, these current standards demand more, expect more of our kids and our teachers than the prior ones did. These standards are called Common Core. They expect people, they expect kids to learn deeper. Fewer subjects deeper. They're less concerned with the kid knowing the answer than the process to come up with an answer and to come up with multiple ways to get at that answer. My daughter came up with some word problem based on a cereal box the other day and she actually had two different ways to solve the problem that she posed and I hadn't thought of the second one and I was incredibly impressed. And she wasn't doing it for any other reason, just to start, she likes to talk. So, that's what's happening with our kids and that's a great thing. There was a panel just last week where we had the current Wake County Public School Teacher of the Year, a prior Wake County Public School Principal of the Year, and a Prior Wake County Assistant Principal of the Year and what the assistant principal, Miss Rodgers, said is these standards are more rigorous, they move from recall, what's the answer, to how to think and multiple ways to get at the problem. Miss Reid, the current Wake County Teacher of the Year, English teacher in high school, she said we're finishing the second year of implementation. She said with her current juniors, who've been doing this now for two years, absolutely she can see an improvement class-wide of how her students think than they did three years ago. They're making arguments rather than stating their opinions. They're annotating their readings, they're connecting subjects. This is what we want out of our public school system. Teachers like this. Anecdotally it's true. I've talked to, at least, 50 teachers this years. My kids are, all three, in public school and I've met with groups of teachers. They have issues originally with some of the assessments, it was not perfect. The assessments weren't really aligned properly with the new standards, they could be improved and they are being improved by the State Board. It was a quick roll out so there was a lot of uncertainty, a lot of, it was different. A lot of the parents are having issues because kids are coming home with homework talking about a solution to a problem

and the parent never learned it that way and so the parents are confused. The teacher said it was hard work. Miss Reid said that the Principal of the Year, Drew Cook, he said this was very hard on the teachers and it made teachers and administrators stretch. It made them uncomfortable. He said, "but that's a good thing, it's like working out your muscles. If you go to the gym you want to hurt because it's uncomfortable. That's exactly what we are expecting of our teachers and our administrators." He says it's a good thing. And then when you look at the polling data, anecdotally there are teachers who like it, anecdotally teachers who don't like it. Polling data shows between 78-82% of teachers embrace this because it allows them to actually spend time teaching. Again, a good thing. So what's the problem with this bill is that it introduces instability at exactly the wrong time. When we just finished the second year of a five year cycle of this new set of standards, Common Course of Study, it will be reevaluated three years from now. Why are we saying to teachers, who have spent untold number of hours learning a new way to teach, the state has invested 66 million dollars in professional development funds to educate teachers on how to teach these new standards. Why are we saying to them all that work you've put in to it, we got a commission and it may throw it all out the window? Now, maybe this commission will come back and say these are the right standards, or they're essentially the right standards, and that would be a good thing to have that stability in the classroom. I tell you what, Mr. Cook, the Wake County Principal of the Year, he said, "the only thing worse than a flawed curriculum is a changed curriculum." Can we not just have a little stability in the public school system? How much have you all turned upside-down on public schools in the last two years? Practically every aspect of their job ya'll are just turning upside-down. This is one thing that is actually working in positive. Do you have to up-end that? I urge you to vote against this bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Any further discussion or debate? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick has the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I think Senator Stein very articulately explained the reasons why I'm deeply concerned about us moving away from our Common Core curriculum. One thing we know is that our students today, I think most of us would agree, are ill-equipped frequently when they graduate from our public school system to go into the work force, to go in to post-secondary education to our community colleges, to our four year institutions. We know that our world is moving towards a knowledge based economy. We know that we need to have our kids smart enough, equipped enough with those skills to be able to compete for the jobs of the future. We know that educators across this country came together. We know that the National Governor's Conference, National Governor's Conference, governor's from all fifty states, republicans and democrats all came together to try to help in developing these standards. The professional educators from all across the country tried to do that. I went back to just see, here in North Carolina, some of those that support Common Core as it is currently put together and the way it's currently being configured. We have SAS, multinational corporation known internationally for the amazing work that it does. They support Common Core as it is. Red Hat, another multinational corporation, GlaxoSmithKlein, Caterpillar, Business and Education Access and Transformation Group, The North Carolina Council on Economic Education, and we go down to some of the other organizations, they include the North Carolina Association for School Administrators, North Carolina Community College System, North Carolina Principals and Assistant Principals, North Carolina School Superintendents, the Professional Educators of North Carolina, The Military Child Education Coalition, North Carolina Parent-Teacher Association, North Carolina Science, Math, and Technology Group. An amazing array of people who are committed to Common Core. It is not time for us to back away. It's a time for us to come together. We need to stick by these 44 other states, the District of Columbia, that are moving in this direction. This morning, when I was driving to the General Assembly, I heard an ad running on the radio from an AM station, 680 on the AM dial

Probably a station that many of you may listen to occasionally because they provide news and actually a more conservative perspective that I enjoy listening to occasionally just to hear how people are thinking. The North Carolina chamber ran two ads during the time I was coming here to Raleigh opposed to abandoning the common core standards. For those reasons we need to stand by what we have done in this state and to be proud of the direction that we’re moving in. We don’t need to reconfigure it, revise it, put up a new board, try to cast it for anything other than what it is. A need for us to subscribe to a higher standard in curriculum in our public schools in North Carolina and nationally. I hope that when you sit back and think about this that you’ll understand that this diverse group of organizations, corporations, all have one thing in mind: having a work force that’s able to take on the jobs of the future, that have competency and skills when it comes to language arts, when it comes to mathematics, when it comes to a broader waves of other subjects that naturally flow from that in terms of analytical skills that our kids develop. So for that reason I cannot support this bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Senators, Senator Bob Rucho has a partial excused absence for the session. Is there any further discussion or debate? Senator Brown what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGE] Speak briefly through the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Senator Brown has the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Thank you Mr. President. I think we all have concerns with what’s happened in the classroom, especially as we probably give our teachers, Senator Stein, that you’ve mentioned, but I think this bill really doesn’t do that. What this bill does is say where we’re at today, we’re going to leave in place, but what we would like to do, and I think the reason we’d like to do it, is because, I know in my district it seems like it’s a 50/50 issue, half the teachers like it, half don’t like it, and so you’ve got a situation in a classroom where a lot of teachers are having to teach something that they don’t like which I think kind of leads to teachers maybe not doing the best job that they can because they haven’t bought into a program. What this bill will do I think is just say let’s continue where we’re at but let’s step back a second and look at these standards and see if we can make them better, and while we’re working on those we’ll continue what we have, but let’s try to do and make it better if we can and get more buy in I think from all the teachers, not half the teachers, and I think that’s important. If we can get all the teachers on board then you’re going to have a happier classroom which will in the end be better for the kids and I think that’s what it’s all about in the end anyway is the kids. Again I think this bill says let’s take a deep breath, let’s look at this, let’s try to improve it, let’s make North Carolina standards the best in the nation if possible and at the same time not step back, let’s continue where we’re at but just try to make it better. I think that’s a common sense bill, makes good sense. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Senator Soucek what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGE] Speak a second time to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] You have the floor to speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] I wonder just two quick things that we heard. First of all, one of the big concerns we had was what do changes look like in the classroom for teachers and students? As specifically put in the bill that the commission needs to consider the impact that educators including leave for professional development, it’s reiterated as a top concern because we realized that is a concern and that it has to be something they consider. And second, Senator Tillman and I were talking with the chamber of commerce today this afternoon and they are in support of this bill. Thank you, I urge your support. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Senator Robinson what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGE] To speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Senator Robinson has the floor to speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGE] Thank you Mr. Chair. Senator Brown I appreciate what you just said and I would say to Senator Tillman and Soucek and maybe if we were involved in your conversations as your making those suggestions or decisions, maybe we get the full flavor of what the intent is. I support common core because for many years what I’ve seen is that children in North Carolina have not been competitive across the country and one of the important things is not just to be able to get jobs, go to college, but also to be competitive across the country, across the world, as they move in..

... different arenas, and so common core for me has said that we will have a common set of requirements, we will teach common things, but the teachers and educators have the ability to come up with making up that curriculum, what works. And they have been involved. One teacher sent a note to all of you that said that for the first time, she’s the facilitator in her classroom. Her children understand mathematical concepts. They do multiplication. They can discuss what the concept means. So they are being creative. They are learning to think and apply concepts, and that’s part of what common core does, and so my objection to this change is that it doesn’t represent what you just said. To teachers that I’ve heard from, to NCAE, to other people, it represents changing something that has just begun. And yeah, they were real confused about it. We were too to some extent, and it was not clear. So anything new has to have a chance to work out, but they’re at a point, a lot of them, where they are getting involved in it, they’re working at it, children are getting adjusted. They’re beginning to learn how to learn a different way. They’re getting excited about it. Kids are excited now coming home. Yeah, they’re always telling parents things the parents don’t know, but they’re getting their parents engaged too, and so that’s what it is, is a higher level of thinking, and that’s where we have to get our children, to be at a higher level of thinking, and that’s what common core gives – the opportunity. Now if it’s just going to be in place and people are going to evaluate like you said, that’s a whole different perspective, but that’s not what I read in the bill and that’s not even what I heard, and so that gives me cause for concern, that there are some things maybe we could agree on if we were part of a discussion and understood where this was going. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any further discussion or debate? Senator Tucker, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill and to ask Senator Robinson a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Which one do you want to do first, Senator? [SPEAKER CHANGES] A question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Robinson, do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Robinson, when the Governor’s Association and educators across the country were putting together common core, did you have any input into that, and if so or if not, how can you wholly accept that? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tucker, for years I’ve had input in education because I as a citizen have been very involved, have made recommendations, have read the latest reports, etcetera. [SPEAKER CHANGES] So the answer’s no, you did not specifically have input. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, as a citizen I put my input in. [SPEAKER CHANGES] But not into common core. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Did you ask a question? I answered it. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Do you have a follow-up question, Senator Tucker? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Well I asked a specific question and you did not answer it. Mr. President. Let me ask you specifically, did - [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Robinson, do you yield for a question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] If the gentleman is going to ask a question and I can answer it. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President, if the lady will specifically answer my question. Did you have input into the common core as the Governor’s Association was preparing it? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I was not a part of the Governor’s Association, but as a citizen I had input. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes ma’am. Thank you so much. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator, do you want to speak to the bill? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I’d like to ask Senator Tillman a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, in putting together this bill and everyone coming across from the state, from North Carolina, to give you input in six months of work into this, you allow North Carolina to be a participant in a discussion is the way I understand this bill to be presented. Is that correct? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes it is. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Another question, Mr. President, if I could. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. Tillman, is this bill going to be disruptive? Does it allow continuity in the classroom, and will educators continue to have input into what goes into the classroom? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Senator. Mr. President, Senator Brown brought this up that we are not taking the rug out from anything as it currently stands. What we’re doing is giving the standards commission the leeway to take these standards and improve upon them, change them, keep them, whatever they wish to do, and the method for assessing them is in their hands, and they will take input from all across the state just as we have, and I trust that will not be disruptive, and don’t believe it when Senator Stein was wrong when he said we’re in the second year of five year. I corrected him the other day. If we were in the third year, we…

Two years to go, we'll have a total reevaluation of all the standards anyway. And all this will be rather seamless as we go forward. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Okay thank you sir. Speak to the bill, sir. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I'll be in support of this because I had some issues with the way Common Core was introduced. A lot of the confusion that was there in the classroom. Many of the teachers are teaching towards Common Core. You're right, Senator Stein in that what the gentleman said from Wake County that the only bad curriculum is a changed curriculum. Moving forward, we don't want to get five years into this and realize it was a bad curriculum. All I want to know is that the rigors of academics are still continuing to happen because our current community colleges are spending about 86 million a year in remedial math and English. Our university system is spending about 3 million a year in remedial math and English. So if this can make them more competitive and we can introduce more rigor and more continuity in classrooms, then my support for the bill is here. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion or debate. Hearing none. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Wade, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To ask Senator Tillman a question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman, I've had just hundreds of emails about Common Core from parents that are concerned and my concern here today as I've heard a lot about teachers and changing how teachers are going to be teaching, and we've talked a little bit about the children. But we haven't had a whole lot of discussion about the parents, who of course are very concerned about this issue. And I think you've done a marvelous job here in trying to address these concerns in this bill. And I'd like for you to speak just a minute on how this is going to bring our school families the way I think of it, together. With the parents, the teachers and the children. And I think we need to address it that way and would you mind just giving us a little input on that? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President, yes. Parents for the most part, did not have a big role in any of the Common Core conglomerate of the states as they met with the state school superintendents and the governors and those people made up that committee. Parents are telling me they didn't have any input at all. And now they've had input. That committee meeting room in the LRC and again yesterday was full of parents. And I think they got a standing ovation when someone spoke against it and they had to be called down, they were so exuberant that they had a chance to be heard on this. So parents are heavily involved in what we've done now. And I've appreciated their input very much. Yes, thank you Senator Wade. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Is there any further discussion or debate? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McLauren, to what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Soucek, do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Senator Soucek. I noticed in section 2F the department of administration shall provide the meeting rooms, equipment, supplies. Could you just share with us why the department of administration is involved in this process, instead of the department of public instruction? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I don't know the distinction between the two of those. Senator Tillman, I refer that question to him, that portion of the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman do you yield for a question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I yield, Mr. President. That's a very good question, Senator. We felt like they needed an independence of not right under the eye of the state superintendent or the state board of education. If they want to work independently as a bona fide legitimate standards commission, let's let them have some removal from there. Everything they do has got to be approved by the state board, so it'll go there. But physically I'm sure they would like a little breathing room and that's why we did that. I think it'll be helpful in the end and it all has to be approved by the state board anyway. Good question. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McLauren. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Tillman do you yield for a follow up? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. So nobody's been left out of this process. Is that the point you're making? That this will be an inclusive organization seeking input not only from parents and teachers but no group is being excluded from the process of this commission. [SPEAKER CHANGES] For six months now in the LRC we've heard testimony. Around my desk I've had the chamber. I've had the governor's office. I've had ?? North Carolina. I have had the

School superintendent, state board chairman. Every base that we could touch. And thankfully in working through this and getting their input, we've come up with a better bill than we started with. And we have their support now, which means it's a common sense approach. Let's throw out our own standards and let's make them higher. They're too weak in the upper level math. That's all I want to is put it in our hands, and not some national conglomerative state. Most national efforts don't work anyway. They have no tests and I don't think they will have, that will test everybody in America to see how we compare. We will have our own test. They will be nationally benchmarked, validated and be highly successful tests that's been used all over the place, that will have the validity that we need. So I trust this system to be better for North Carolina. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Richard has returned to the chamber. Is there any further discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the senate is the passage of committee substitute to senate bill 812 as amended, on its second reading. All in favor vote aye. Opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for voting. The clerk will record the vote. 33 having voted in the affirmative and 15 in the negative, the committee substitute to senate bill 812 as amended passes its second reading. Without objection it will be read a third time. [SPEAKER CHANGES] North Carolina general assembly enacts. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion or debate. Hearing none, the question before the senate is the passage of the committee substitute to senate bill 812 as amended on its third reading. All in favor say aye. Opposed no. The ayes have it. Committee substitute to senate bill 812 as amended passes its third reading. Amendments will be engrossed and passed to the house. Senate Bill 3. The clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senate Bill 3. Job maintenance and capital development fund modifications. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Davis is recognized to explain the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you, Mr. President. Ladies and gentlemen of the senate. As most of you know, JMAC is an acronym for Jobs Maintenance and Capital Development Fund. It's a program that's been in place since 2007. It's managed by the department of commerce. The whole purpose for it is to retain high paying, good quality, good benefit jobs in North Carolina. And it's been very successful. It's been used for ??, it's been used for Goodyear. And Bridgestone Firestone very successfully. The reason for wanting to expand this program is I found a case in my own district from Evergreen Packaging. Those of you who are familiar with Western North Carolina may remember it as Champion Paper. It's been in place for a hundred years. And they have spent a significant sum of money for pollution control over the years. And the EPA is coming down on them to upgrade their facility even more, which is going to require them going to natural gas. At the present time, they burn about ten carloads of coal a day. They have five generating stations and turbines and they're wanting to convert some of those to natural gas. The problem is that natural gas wasn't available in sufficient quantities. Let me tell you a little about what Champion Paper does. Or Evergreen Packaging now. It's been in Canton since, well for over a hundred years. They employ 1400 people in North Carolina. 1200 of them are in Haywood County. 200 are in a coating plant here in the Raleigh area. Their annual payroll is about 94 and a half million dollars. They have a 240 million dollar impact on the local economy every year. And the EPA is coming down on them to comply with these latest environmental regulations. Since 1990, they have spent 330 million dollars in pollution control. And so by expanding what this bill will allow us to do to a Tier 2 county and presently it's only a Tier 1 county. By expanding it to a Tier 2 county would enable plants like Evergreen to be able to qualify for some of these funds. Evergreen needs about 2 million dollars a year for 6 years for a total investment of about 12 million dollars. Also let me tell you what Evergreen does in their impact in North Carolina. They pay about a million dollars in income tax. They pay a million dollars to the town of Waynesville in property tax. A million dollars to the county of Haywood in property tax. They pay about 330 thousand dollars a year in franchise tax. They have a significant impact in Western North Carolina. So for plants like Evergreen that are struggling with complying with these onerous environmental regulations, it is essential

We expand the scope of jmag funding and that's what this particular bill would do. It does not impact Tier 1 counties' accessibility funds because as a matter of fact we're lowering the benchmarks for Tier 1 counties to be able to qualify. But we are enabling Tier 2 counties to qualify for these funds once certain benchmarks are met, and the benchmark for a Tier 2 county is 800 jobs and of course there are clawback provisions. There is minimal investment in capital expenditure. Plans like evergreen would qualify for all of these. I would really ask for your support for this bill and I would be glad to ask any questions that any of you may have. Is there any other discussion and debate? Bearing none, the question before the senate is the passage of the committee substitute senate bill 3. All in favor vote Aye. Opposed vote No. Five seconds be allowed for the voting. The clerk will record the vote. 48 having voted in the affirmative and 0 in the negative, the committee substitute senate bill 3 passes second reading without objection. It will be read a third time. ?? Is there any discussion and debate? Bearing none, the question before the senate is the passage of the committee substitute senate bill 3 on its third reading. All in favor will say Aye. Aye. Those No. The Ayes have it. The substitute senate bill 3 passes on its third reading it'll be sent to the house. Senator Walters recognized from Robeson. Thank you Mr. President. I am advised that we are still in need of some time for some amendments to the remaining bill on the calendar. I know that we started well before lunch and we're into the lunch hour now. What I would ask is that we take a recess from now until 1:30 so folks can have lunch, we'll come back at 1:30 and finish up the calendar. Senate will stand in recess until 1:30. Senate, Senate back to order. Leaves of absences are granted for the remainder of the session to senators Barefoot, Jenkins, Hunt, Allran. Continuing with the calendar, senate bill 743, the clerk will read. Senate Bill 743 North Carolina Economic Development Partnership ?? Mr. President Senator Brown for reason do you rise? I think I've explained the bill, I hope I've explained it well enough, but I'll be glad to answer any questions. I do have an amendment I'd like to set forth. ?? may send forth his amendment. The, is it on the... It is on there. OK thank you. The clerk will read. Senator Brown moves to amend the bill. Senator Brown you're recognized to explain the amendment. Thank you Mr. President. All this does is just make sure and clarify that the only funds that the general assembly's obligated to are the funds that are in section six which is the 20 million dollars. For the discussion and debate on the amendment? Senator Stein, for what reason do you ri.. Any further discussion on the amendment? Hearing none, all those in favor of adopting amendment one will vote Aye, all those opposed will vote No. Five seconds will be allowed for the vote. The clerk will record the vote. Daniel Aye. Rucho Aye. 41 have been voted Aye. 0 voted No. Amendment one is adopted. The bill is back before us. Senator Rabin for what purpose do you rise? Send forward an amendment. The gentleman may send forward his amendment. Is it on the dashboard? I think it is sir. The clerk will read. Rabin of ?? moves to amend the bill. Senator Rabin you're recognized to explain the amendment. Thank you Mr. President. What this amendment does is it brings, it conforms section six of this bill with the ?? ?? grant programs that it is aligned with, and it removes the fee of filing.

That basically. Technical. That’s correct. That’s something. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion or debate? Hearing none. All those in favor of adopting amendment 2 will vote aye, all those opposed will vote nay. Five seconds will be allowed for the vote. The clerk will record the vote. Thirty-nine voted in the affirmative and two in the negative. Amendment carries. Correction. Someone else just voted. It’s 40 to 2. Amendment carries. And, the bill is right before us. Any further discussion or debate? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes, Senator McKissick. For what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To send forth an amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The gentleman may send forth this amendment. Is it on the dash board? [SPEAKER CHANGES] It should be. [SPEAKER CHANGES] The cleric will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick moves to amend the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick you are recognized to explain the amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] This amendment is pretty straightforward. As many of you are familiar, within this bill there is an under 20,000 dollar limitation on the amount that of state money that can be paid for employees on this new non-profit that’s being established. What this bill, what this amendment would basically do is to add language to this bill that basically says that the non-profit would go out and do an analysis of salaries, bonuses, compensation levels for its employees, officers and other personnel. It makes certain in the process they establish some sort of advocates that are appropriate and compensation in terms of not just the money going in but also benefits. It’s reasonably anticipated that there will private funds that may supplement the under 20,000 maximum in state funds that might be applicable to some employees. I think the thing we all want to know is that once the standards are established that there is nothing embarrassing done with people making 225,000 dollars or something. When this whole thing is set up and established. I’ve discussed this amendment with Secretary Decker and he supports it. I’ve also discussed it with Senator Brown, so I would ask for your support. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brock for what reason do you ask? [SPEAKER CHANGES] See if Senator McKissick would yield for a question? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick do you yield? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Yes I do. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Just reading your amendment now. Looking at the study and analysis. That’s a lot of hard personal information that’s going to be out there and in this public/private partnership. There’s going to be a whole lot of information on employees, date, and information. Something we’re kind of doing in the state to tighten down what loose ends we have in IT and technology. Who will be responsible for this information if we have a date breach? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Essentially what we’re assembling is data from what’s going on in other states. To make sure that when salaries are established here that they are reasonable, comparable, and not excessive. So, it’s compiling data from other states that would be utilized to establish appropriate compensation levels for employees of the non-profit. So, that’s what this is focused upon. Okay. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion? Further debate? Hearing none. All those in favor of amendment 3 as presented by Senator McKissick will vote aye. All those opposed will vote no. Five seconds are allowed for the vote. The clerk will record the vote. Forty two, Forty three having voted aye, and zero voting no. Amendment 3 carries. The bill is back before us. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr President? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Rabin for what reason do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] To speak on the bill, if I may be allowed to finish what I started please sir? [SPEAKER CHANGES] You are allowed. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you. Ladies and gentleman I stood before you a few minutes ago to thank you for the work done by the staff and by this group on Part 6 of this bill. Which is the film program. I’m proud of what it does and I’m proud of everybody for the work that is done.

It gives us in the Senate and in the legislature fiscal predictability. It does the same for the industry. That is a good business practice and I applaud it. It closes loopholes in the current program that has brought about some pretty hard hitting articles in the media from both sides recently. And I think that is a good thing. It sets priorities for the secretary and for the program and I think those will be good for North Carolina. And it shows good faith between the legislature and the state in the film industry. It aligns itself with the JMAC and ?? programs of the state, which try to keep good business here, here. And try to grow and bring new business to the state. So I applaud you for your efforts and I appreciate everything all of you have done and I respectfully ask you to support this bill all the way. Thank you. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brock, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Speak to the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Gentleman has the floor. [SPEAKER CHANGES] You know when it rains, sometimes people say it's a good day to go to the movies. One thing I don't like about this program is that we're taking money out of the rainy day fund. We're taking money out of the repair and renovation fund. We have a lot of needs in our state, especially with our buildings. Our university system alone has a 2 billion dollar list of repair and renovations that we need in our schools. So many times governments want to brand new buildings without cleaning out the gutters in the buildings we already have now. I wish we could find the money from some other place. Because these rainy days are coming. Buildings are going to fall in on themselves. Because we don't do our duty and take care of them. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brown, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] I have to send up one more technical amendment. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brown, you may present your amendment. Is it on the dashboard? If so, the clerk will read. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator Brown moves to amend the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] It's really on page 5, line 9. Just changing some working. It really is just technical. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Further discussion, further debate on amendment 4? Hearing none, all those in favor of adopting amendment 4 will vote aye. All opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for the vote. Clerk will record the vote. 44 having voted in the affirmative, and zero in the negative, amendment 4 is adopted. The bill is back before us. Further discussion, further debate. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Mr. President. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick, for what purpose do you rise? [SPEAKER CHANGES] Speak on the bill. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Senator McKissick you are recognized. [SPEAKER CHANGES] One thing I'd like to say is I'm going to support this bill. But in doing so, I want to say that I think our department of commerce has done an outstanding job over the decades in recruiting jobs, businesses and industry to our state. I think the thing that's undetermined and that is moving forward with this new non-profit. I hope and I trust that this new experiment will provide meaningful, substantial results. I also hope that if it does not produce the results that are anticipated, that we'll be able to revise this structure that's being established or perhaps going back to the way we've done business in the past. But we'll never know if we could have done better unless we look out over that horizon and open minded enough to try something different. For that reason I'm going to support this. But one thing that Secretary assured me is that we have benchmarks in here about how much money this non-profit needs to raise. For each year, 750 thousand I think the first year and after that 1.25 million for subsequent years. She assured me that there will be consequences attached if they do not reach those thresholds. I trust her in going back and coming back with such a contract, because I think that we need to have some clearly articulatable standards for what we expect this non-profit to do.

In terms of results, in terms of recruiting business and industry and being a better vehicle and mechanism, but likewise, if we’re not getting in the funding for the private sector that we anticipate, that we do indeed have a mechanism in place to restructure the contract or to cancel the contract. And likewise, appropriate firewalls need to be established. We want to incentivize people to go ahead and contribute to this nonprofit. That’s appropriate. They should not be penalized if they contribute toward this entity, and then there’s something that comes along later, that might be a business initiative that will result in expansion of our economy and creating more jobs here in North Carolina. But at the same time there has to be a firewall that’s appropriate. Appropriate so that there’s not any potential conflicts of interest or improprieties as a part of this process. So I feel optimistic, that all of these issues can be addressed. Time will tell. And as it relates to the most recent amendment dealing with the film industry, one thing I can clearly say, North Carolina in recent years has reached a significant level of prominence throughout this country. We’ve had films like Ironman 3 and Hunger Games that could really put us on the map, along with a variety of other, of regular series and productions. I’m glad to see that North Carolina is taking a measured effort in trying to eliminate abuses, while at the same time targeting opportunities, that will enhance our visibility and prominence in the film industry and continue to reap benefits for our economy. [Speaker changes] Is there further discussion or debate? Hearing none, the question before the senate is the passage of senate bill 743 as amended on its second reading. All in favor will vote aye, all opposed will vote no. Five seconds will be allowed for voting, and the clerk will record the vote. [Speaker changes] 38. [Speaker changes] 38 voting in, aye, and 6 voting no. Senate bill 743 has passed its second reading, and with, will without objection, be read a third time. [Speaker changes] Mr. President. [Speaker changes] Uh, Senator Stein [Speaker changes] I object to the third reading. With, will, the, film piece just was added in appropriations this morning, a number of amendments were made today on the floor. I’d like to have the weekend to take a look at it, please. [Speaker changes] Objections being risen by Senator Stein, the bill will be carried over to the next session. And at this time, ladies and gentlemen, is there anything left on our calendar? Seeing none, we will have, first of all, I’d like to, have us all recognize our pages who have been here for the short period of two days. To them it might seem like a week and a half. But we have certainly enjoyed having them, and let’s give them all a round of applause for their service. [applause] We look forward to seeing you here again. Notices and announcements? Senator Rabon, for what purpose do you rise? [Speaker changes] Moment of personal privilege, please? [Speaker changes] Gentleman has the floor. [Speaker changes] We’ve had a great exercise in freedom this week. I think because of the way the weekend is breaking, I’d like to ask everyone tomorrow, to think about those who paid the price so we could have that freedom. It’ll be D-Day, the 6th of June. A great day in our history with great people who made great sacrifices for us. Thank you. [Speaker changes] Further notices or announcements? Is there further business to come before the senate? Senator Berger, for what reason do you? [Speaker changes] Mr. President, I have a motion that I’d like to make, the, the amendments to, and I’m looking for the bill number that, that we just took up. 747. [Speaker changes] 743. [Speaker changes] 743. I would move that the amendments be engrossed between second and third reading on that bill, so that folks can see exactly how things fit in, before we get back here to vote on it a third time. [Speaker changes] Without objection, so ordered. Further business to come before the senate? If not, the chair recognizes.

Senator Berger floor motion. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Mr. President. I'd like to say something first before and I think it's already been alluded to, but this weekend is the D-Day anniversary. I remember point of personal privilege Mr. President. I think that'd be the best way to put it. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Go ahead sir. [SPEAKER CHANGES] I remember growing up. Many of you probably the same. A lot of World War 2 veterans in the neighborhood. A lot of folks, friends, their parents were involved in World War 2. December the 7th was a big day every year, and it seems the further we get away from that time, the points in time of the significant advance in World War 2, become less and less a part of our daily life. June the 6th, 1944 has been, was, will continue to be a significant day in history. I think it's important, with the chamber's permission, I would ask that we adjourn today in honor of all the remaining veterans of World War 2 that are still living. And with that Mr. President, I would move that the Senate now adjourn subject to the receipt and re-referral of messages from the House and the Governor. The referral and re-referral of bills and resolutions. The receipt and and re-referral of committee reports and ratification of bills. To reconvene on Monday June 9, 2014 at 7 pm, and again I ask that be in honor of our remaining World War 2 veterans. [SPEAKER CHANGES] Thank you Senator. The motion is that the Senate do now adjourn subject to the stipulation as stated by Senator Berger to reconvene Monday, June 9th at 7 pm. Seconded by Senator Rabin. All in favor say aye. All opposed may say no. ?? the Senate stands adjourned.